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Mynah

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The aggressive mynah was introduced to New Zealand from Asia. Its colouring is very distinctive – it has a black head, yellow beak and patch around the eye, and a cinnamon-brown body.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Grey warbler

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Grey warblers (riroriro) use cobwebs, lichen, twigs and leaves to build enclosed nests with a side entrance. As well as native forests, they have adapted to living in pine forests and well-planted urban gardens. Their trilling call is a familiar sign of spring. Sound file from Birds ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Riroriro (grey warbler) and nest

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The position of the riroriro’s nest was said to indicate the prevailing wind – the bird always placed the entrance away from the wind. Listen to the riroriro’s call. Like the pīpīwharauroa (shining cuckoo), the riroriro’s call signalled the arrival of spring and the time...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Little owl

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Originally introduced from Germany, little owls are now established in the South Island. They are found mainly in flat pastoral country, especially on the east coast, while the native morepork is found more commonly on the west coast.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage