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The Waipāoa River

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Listen to this extract from the waiata (song) ‘Ka haramai a Pāoa’. It describes an incident following the arrival of the Horouta canoe which explains the origin of the Waipāoa River (pictured). When the Horouta was damaged on a reef, it was hauled ashore and the ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Volcanic avalanche mounds

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Most large cone volcanoes have a complex history of cone-building followed by collapse. The mounds in front of Mt Taranaki (Mt Egmont) are the remains of a huge landslide that occurred about 23,000 years ago when a large volcanic cone collapsed and spread ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Waipāoa River

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Some traditions explain the origin of natural phenomena. Pāoa was said to have created three rivers by urinating, including the Waipāoa (literally the water of Pāoa). This song, ‘Ka haramai a Pāoa’ (the arrival of Pāoa), tells of this and his other exploits. Sound file ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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The Waipāoa River

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This extract from the waiata (song) ‘Ka haramai a Pāoa’ explains some of the history of the arrival of the Horouta canoe. Notably, it gives an account of how the Waipāoa River (pictured) was formed. Sound file from Radio New...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Ross Gregory talks about Tūmoana

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Tūmoana was captain of the Tinana canoe, which landed at Moria, now known as Te Tauroa, near present-day Ahipara. The image shows Te Tauroa. In the sound file, Ross Gregory, of the northern tribe Te Rarawa, talks about Tūmoana and his career after landing. Sound file from

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Paparoa National Park

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Paparoa National Park, on the South Island’s West Coast, was founded in 1987. The Pancake Rocks, jutting into the sea, are among the park’s best-known sights. The limestone they are formed from underlies most of the landscape, and can be seen running diagonally up the hill to the left...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Mt Taranaki (Mt Egmont)

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The classic cone shape of Mt Taranaki (Mt Egmont) indicates that it is an active volcano. At 2,518 metres, it is the second-highest mountain in the North Island. A small subsidiary volcanic cone, Fanthams Peak, can be seen in the foreground. Detailed studies by scientists from Massey ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage