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Sound designer Nigel Scott

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In the early 2000s Nigel Scott was the senior sound operator at Wellington's Park Road Post studios, and was music editor for all three Lord of the rings films. He has also worked internationally in television and live theatre. He graduated in theatre technology from Toi ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Earnslaw on Lake Wakatipu

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The Earnslaw is a steamer that was built in Dunedin in the early 1900s, and launched on Lake Wakatipu in 1912. For over 50 years the boat carried people and freight to and from remote communities around the lake, but since the 1970s it has been mainly used for scenic cruises. ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Chorus cicada

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The largest New Zealand cicada is the chorus cicada (Amphipsalta zelandica). The length of its body with the wings folded is about 40 millimetres. Chorus cicadas gather in large numbers around the time they emerge from their nymph skins, from January. Common in the North Island and some ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Red-crowned parakeet

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The red-crowned parakeet is almost extinct on the North and South islands, but remains abundant on stoat-free Stewart Island and the Auckland Islands, as well as a number of small islands without rats or stoats. It nests in tree hollows or ground burrows. There are another two subspecies – ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Pros and cons of sex work: Anna Reed

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Anna Reed has been the Canterbury regional coordinator for the New Zealand Prostitutes' Collective since the late 1980s, and still held the position in 2010. Reed, pictured here in the 1980s, talks about why she enjoyed sex work. While many sex workers do not experience pleasure with ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Woolston Brass

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Woolston Brass (formerly Skellerup Woolston) takes part in the street march at the 2001 New Zealand National Band Championship at Whanganui. The band won this event for the 18th consecutive time. Listen to the band play ‘Flourish for an occasion’.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Formation of Crown research institutes

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

On July 1, 1992, 10 Crown research institutes were formed – the most radical reorganisation of government science in New Zealand’s history. The aim was to group scientists into institutes with separate research aims and subject areas. They also provided...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Kauri felling

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Bushman Billy Mack takes a break while felling a giant kauri at Kauaeranga valley, Thames, in 1921. First, wedge-shaped ‘scarfs’ were cut into the trunk on the side the bushmen wanted the tree to fall. Then the trunk was sawn from the other side until the tree toppled. Listen ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Shining cuckoo

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Shining cuckoos (pīpīwharauroa) return to New Zealand each spring after spending winter in the tropics. Like other cuckoos around the world, they lay their egg in the nest of another species and let the foster parents raise their chick. Despite this apparently easy existence their numbers ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Barrie Devenport after his Cook Strait swim

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

On 20 November 1962 Barrie Devenport made history as the first person in modern times to swim Cook Strait. He is shown here, soon after making it to the South Island, flanked by support swimmers from the Worser Bay Life Saving Club. This radio coverage is of the last moments of his swim. ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Preparing muttonbird containers

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Men prepare pōhā (containers made from bull kelp) to hold tītī (muttonbirds), in 1910. The pōhā were put into flax baskets and surrounded with tōtara bark. Listen to Ngāi Tahu elder Bob Whaitiri talk about using pōhā with tītī. Sound file from

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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The language of mustering

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Sheep mustering on horseback with dogs in the South Island high country has led to a wide range of terms to describe the work, clothing and lifestyle. Listen to John Gordon discussing the colourful language of mustering. Sound file from

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Recording the countryside

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Nevile Lodge’s cartoon of Jim Henderson with a microphone in hand appeared in the book version of ‘Open country’. ‘Open country’ was a regular radio show in the 1950s and 1960s, which broadcast short stories from rural New Zealand. The sound file ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Little owl

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Originally introduced from Germany, little owls are now established in the South Island. They are found mainly in flat pastoral country, especially on the east coast, while the native morepork is found more commonly on the west coast.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Rooks

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Rooks have a fierce beak and glossy feathers. The rook is the only member of the crow family in New Zealand, as the two endemic New Zealand ravens are now extinct. Sound file from the Department of Conservation

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Male and female blackbirds

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Although blackbirds are probably New Zealand’s most widespread bird, not many people know that only the male (top) is actually black. It also has a distinctive orange beak. The female blackbird (bottom) is brown with a variegated underside. She builds the...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Chico the cockatoo

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Although there is now a population of wild sulphur-crested cockatoos, they were originally brought to New Zealand as caged birds and some, such as Chico, are tethered pets. Chico perched on owner Robert Nelson’s shoulder while he cycled around Lower Hutt ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Loading kiore bait

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This helicopter is loading poison bait to eradicate kiore from Little Barrier Island (Hauturu), in 2004. Because kiore eat native plants and animals, the Department of Conservation has worked to eradicate the rats from Crown-owned islands. Listen to ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Whistling frog

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

A native of south-eastern Australia and Tasmania, the brown whistling frog is the smallest of the three introduced frogs. Eggs are laid under water and hatch into free-swimming tadpoles, unlike the native species. Its call is a familiar sound on the South Island’s West Coast, as well as on ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Green and golden bell frog

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The green and golden bell frog was introduced to Auckland from Sydney in the 1860s. The brownish eardrum shows clearly, just behind the eye. The female grows to 9 centimetres, and the smaller male to 6 centimetres. It lays thousands of eggs on water, and these hatch as small black tadpoles. With ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage