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Tūī and its song

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

A tūī rests on the frond of a fern. Its melodious call inspired the saying 'Me he korokoro tūī' (like the throat of a tūī), which referred to someone with a beautiful singing voice. Sound file from Radio New Zealand Sound Archives Ng...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Scottish settlers

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Some 800 Scottish settlers made their home at Waipū from 1854 onward, bringing with them precious mementoes such as this book of Highland music. Their leader, Norman McLeod, was charismatic and fanatical, preaching hellfire and demanding subservience from his followers. Listen to a descendant of...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Cathy Coleborne

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Cathy Coleborne is an Australian who has taught history at Waikato University since 1999. In New Zealand she has become a follower of rugby and rugby league, sports that are more popular in New Zealand than Victoria. In spite of the traditional rivalry between the two countries, she is a ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Te Aute Maori Boys’ College

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Set up to educate young Māori from a community grant in 1854, Te Aute College (and subsequently its sister school Hukarere Maori Girls’ College) has produced many well-known Māori leaders. Hear students from Te Aute College perform the haka ‘Te Haka o Te Aute Kāreti’. This ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Mokomoko’s pardon, 1993

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Wharehuia Milroy of Ngāi Tūhoe talks about the visit of the justice minister Doug Graham in 1993, to apologise to Te Whakatōhea and the descendants of Mokomoko. Mokomoko was wrongfully accused and hanged for the murder of the missionary, Carl Völkner, in 1865. Shown here is Hiona St ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage