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The home of the ancestors

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Taranaki tribal historian Te Miringa Hōhaia talks about the kāinga (village) Karakatonga which was the ancient dwelling place of Te Kāhui Maunga – the people of the mountains.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Parihaka gatherings

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This gathering of people at Parihaka was photographed in the 1880s. Such events have been taking place since the Taranaki wars of the 1860s. At that time the Parihaka leaders Te Whiti-o-Rongomai and Tohu Kākahi set up a regular forum called Tekau mā waru (‘The Eighteenth’) which ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Tainui canoe

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In Māori oral tradition there are many stories of the founding canoes. One of these was the Tainui canoe which first landed in the Bay of Plenty before journeying to the Waitematā Harbour. There it was dragged across the 200-metre portage to the Manukau Harbour. This hauling chant is ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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TrinityRoots

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

An area of Māori innovation is music. Here are two clips from the album Home, land and sea by the band TrinityRoots, whose lead singer is Warren Maxwell of Ngāi Tūhoe (pictured). The other members are Rio Hemopo of Ngāti Tuwharetoa and Riki Gooch of Ngāti Māhanga. The songs ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Speaker of the House of Representatives

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In 2004 the Speaker of the House of Representatives was Jonathan Hunt, photographed here beside artist Ryuzo Mishida’s portrait of him. The Speaker, who is elected by MPs, determines the proceedings of the House and keeps order. He is also responsible...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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‘God defend New Zealand’

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

New Zealand is unusual in having two national anthems of equal standing – ‘God save the queen’ (or king), and the more recent ‘God defend New Zealand’. When a member of the royal family is present the former is preferred. However, increasingly on public occasions and...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Michael Joseph Savage

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Labour Prime Minister Michael Joseph Savage is seen here opening the head office of the new Department of Social Security on 27 March 1939. After suffering setbacks in the 1920s, the Labour Party was finally swept into power in 1935. The government set up a...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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National Party campaign booklet, 1949

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

During the 1949 election campaign, the National Party pictured itself in booklets such as this as representing the nuclear family, the ideal social unit of those years. After winning the 1949 election, National tightened its hold on power in 1951. Prime ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Mokomoko’s pardon, 1993

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Wharehuia Milroy of Ngāi Tūhoe talks about the visit of the justice minister Doug Graham in 1993, to apologise to Te Whakatōhea and the descendants of Mokomoko. Mokomoko was wrongfully accused and hanged for the murder of the missionary, Carl Völkner, in 1865. Shown here is Hiona St ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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‘Pō, pō’

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This extract from the lullaby ‘Pō, pō’, performed by the Waihirere Māori Club, tells how the kūmara (sweet potato) – a vital source of food for the ancient Māori – was brought to New Zealand. Various tribes provide different accounts of who was responsible for ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Waiata poi

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This waiata poi (chant to accompany a poi dance), composed by Ruka Broughton in the 1960s, refers to changes in Māori society at that time. Its main subject is the migration of young Māori from the country to the city, and the challenges they face.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Proof of Spanish discovery?

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Some have speculated that Spanish or Portuguese ships reached New Zealand, or became wrecked on its coast, before Abel Tasman’s arrival in 1642. This ‘Spanish helmet’, allegedly fished out of Wellington Harbour, is seen by some as proof ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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A Zimbabwean talks about home

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Immigrant Peter Baldwin, who arrived in New Zealand with his family in 2000, talks about Robert Mugabe’s government and the family’s reasons for leaving Zimbabwe.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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‘Dad and Dave’

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Australian values and attitudes came to New Zealand not just with the immigrants, but also via print, radio and television. ‘Dad and Dave’, an Australian radio serial about a rural family in Snake Gully, ran from 1937 to 1953 and had a large following. ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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John van Leeuwen

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In this interview for Echo Radio, John van Leeuwen describes his experiences on emigrating to New Zealand in 1953.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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‘A new life in New Zealand’

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

From 1947 the New Zealand government once more provided assistance with fares for English migrants. Over the next 28 years more than 250,000 arrived, many paying their own way. This display in New Zealand House, London, shows the promises of a new life ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Yorkshire immigrants talk of work in New Zealand and at ‘home’

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In the 1920s there was an increase in immigrants from the more industrial areas of northern England, especially Yorkshire. One Yorkshire immigrant who arrived in 1927 was a man simply known as Mr Pearson. He had worked at a dockyard at South Bank-on-Tees. Here he and his wife discuss the ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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The Holy Trinity Cathedral choir, Auckland

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The Church of England was the strongest denomination in New Zealand, and an important vehicle for the transmission of English values. The choir of the Holy Trinity Cathedral in Auckland, pictured here in 1980, can be heard singing ‘Evening hymn’, composed by the Englishman Henry Balfour ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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News of the 2000 Fiji coup

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Here Aucklanders Jioji Tikodei (left), an ethnic Fijian, and Krishna Lal, an Indo-Fijian, read about the 2000 coup in Fiji. The news of another coup in 2000 (there had been two in 1987) caused many Fijians living in New Zealand to react with dismay. The ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Patricia Winton, American immigrant

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Pat Winton came to New Zealand in 1959 to work for the American embassy in Wellington. She later married a New Zealander, had two children, and in 1995 took out dual New Zealand–United States citizenship. Listen to Pat talk about the differences between ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage