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Insurance fraud

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The insurance business has always been troubled by fake claims. In 2006 pilot Howard Jamieson claimed to have crashed his Cessna aircraft into the sea off Canterbury, and won a claim for more than $200,000. The plane was discovered undamaged six months later, and Jamieson was sentenced to 18 ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Disaster at Hyde

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Onlookers view the crumpled carriages after the Cromwell–Dunedin express came to grief near the town of Hyde on 4 June 1943. The train, which was travelling too fast, derailed on a corner and the carriages piled into each other. Many people were injured, and 24 were killed. Listen ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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‘Kiwis care’ march

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Listen to Tania Harris (centre) and other participants talk about the ‘Kiwis care’ march down Queen Street in 1981. Two of the speakers highlight a widely held public perception that industrial unrest was caused by expatriate British unionists – often called 'Pommie stirrers'.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Winston McCarthy's rugby commentary, 1956

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Winston McCarthy was a legendary radio commentator in the 1950s. He commentated during the famous series between the All Blacks and the Springboks in 1956. The final and deciding test was in Auckland, when a crowd of over 50,000 crammed into the ground. Listen to McCarthy describing Don Clarke

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Gathering shellfish at Motunui reef

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

These Te Āti Awa kuia (female elders) are collecting seafood in the early 1980s in the traditional manner, not far from a proposed outfall from the Motunui synthetic petrol plant. The Waitangi Tribunal, however, in a landmark decision, ruled that the Crown had to protect traditional Māori ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Ferdinand the bull

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Ferdinand the bull has been a Taranaki rugby mascot since the 1950s, and has appeared in a number of guises. This smoke-exhaling version is 'Big Ferdie',  built for a June 2005 match against the Lions. In the audio clip, Taranaki rugby supporters sing of Ferdinand’s talents, to the ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Ambulance communications

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Callers dialing 111 are asked whether they need fire, ambulance or police, and are connected with the appropriate communications centre. Those requiring an ambulance speak to a qualified operator, such as this St John’s officer, who gives instructions on caring for the patient until the ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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The SS Earnslaw

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The SS Earnslaw, built in Dunedin in the early 1900s, first plied Lake Wakatipu in 1912. For 50 years it carried freight and people to and from remote lakeside settlements. Since the 1970s the ship has been used for scenic cruises. British composer Ron Goodwin wrote the ‘Earnslaw Steam ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Te Vaka

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Listen to a segment of a song from the successful Tokelauan band Te Vaka. The pate (log drums) maintain Pacific timbres and beats, forming the backdrop to their songs. They sing of Tokelau’s history and address diverse themes, from the Peruvian ‘blackbirders’ (slave traders) of ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Remembering Johnny Jones

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Mr A. Eccles, grandson of whaler and businessman Johnny Jones, recalls his forebear's enterprises at Waikouaiti in the 1830s and 1840s. Jones developed a farm at Matanaka, near Waikouaiti; some of the buildings are shown here. Sound file from ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Gamelan orchestra

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The unique sound of the gamelan (Indonesian percussion music) has been compared to ‘moonlight and flowing water’. In November 2004 Victoria University of Wellington’s Javanese gamelan orchestra, Padhang Moncar, performed in St Paul’s Cathedral. Listen to Padhang Moncar in ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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‘A new life in New Zealand’

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

From 1947 the New Zealand government once more provided assistance with fares for English migrants. Over the next 28 years more than 250,000 arrived, many paying their own way. This display in New Zealand House, London, shows the promises of a new life offered to prospective migrants. However the...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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The Holy Trinity Cathedral choir, Auckland

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The Church of England was the strongest denomination in New Zealand, and an important vehicle for the transmission of English values. The choir of the Holy Trinity Cathedral in Auckland, pictured here in 1980, can be heard singing ‘Evening hymn’, composed by the Englishman Henry ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Yorkshire immigrants talk of work in New Zealand and at ‘home’

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In the 1920s there was an increase in immigrants from the more industrial areas of northern England, especially Yorkshire. One Yorkshire immigrant who arrived in 1927 was a man simply known as Mr Pearson. He had worked at a dockyard at South Bank-on-Tees. Here he and his wife discuss the ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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A Zimbabwean talks about home

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Immigrant Peter Baldwin, who arrived in New Zealand with his family in 2000, talks about Robert Mugabe’s government and the family’s reasons for leaving Zimbabwe.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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A Western Samoan viewpoint

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The Privy Council decision of 1982, giving all Western Samoans born after 1924 New Zealand citizenship, was not accepted by the New Zealand government. It negotiated a compromise with the Western Samoan government which overturned the Privy Council ruling and gave New Zealand citizenship only to ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Mokomoko’s pardon, 1993

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Wharehuia Milroy of Ngāi Tūhoe talks about the visit of the justice minister Doug Graham in 1993, to apologise to Te Whakatōhea and the descendants of Mokomoko. Mokomoko was wrongfully accused and hanged for the murder of the missionary, Carl Völkner, in 1865. Shown here is Hiona St ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Waiata poi

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This waiata poi (chant to accompany a poi dance), composed by Ruka Broughton in the 1960s, refers to changes in Māori society at that time. Its main subject is the migration of young Māori from the country to the city, and the challenges they face.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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‘Pō, pō’

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This extract from the lullaby ‘Pō, pō’, performed by the Waihirere Māori Club, tells how the kūmara (sweet potato) – a vital source of food for the ancient Māori – was brought to New Zealand. Various tribes provide different accounts of who was responsible for ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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The home of the ancestors

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Taranaki tribal historian Te Miringa Hōhaia talks about the kāinga (village) Karakatonga which was the ancient dwelling place of Te Kāhui Maunga – the people of the mountains.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage