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Maoricicada mangu

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Most of the dark-coloured Maoricicada species live in alpine habitats or other bare, rocky sites. This one, Maoricicada mangu, is distributed east of the main divide from the Kaikōura mountains to Tekapo and the Mackenzie Pass area. Nowhere else in the world do cicadas live in ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Studying cicadas.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Entomologist Charles Fleming searches for small black cicadas of the Maoricicada genus in Otago’s Old Man Range. During the 1960s and 1970s he, his wife Peg, and entomologist John Dugdale carried out extensive surveys of cicadas. Fleming noted that the distribution of cicada ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Sand dune cicada and redtailed cicada songs

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Charles Fleming studied the songs of different cicadas. He found he could use differences in the songs to distinguish species, and similarities to group together related species. Listen to him play the call of the sand dune cicada (Rhodopsalta leptomera, top) and its relative the ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Pepe tuna (pūriri moth)

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This is a male pepe-tuna (pūriri moth, Aenetus virescens). Listen to Hirini Melbourne sing about the ghostly night-time appearance of this giant green moth (its wingspan reaches 15 centimetres). Pepe-tuna nunui Kēhua kākāriki Wairua ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Morepork

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Listen to the call of a morepork (ruru). Moreporks roost during the day and hunt at night. Their large eyes do not move in the sockets. Instead, the morepork swivels its head rapidly, up to 270 degrees. They have good night vision, and hunt insects and small animals. Sound file from ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Brown kiwi

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In the North Island, the brown kiwi is the most numerous kiwi, although it has become confined to three inland areas. It is quite an aggressive little bird, with spiky plumage. It is a proficient runner, and when alarmed can outrun a human being and zigzag at the same time. It has even been known...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Kiwi concert party

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

During the Second World War, the word Kiwis was almost universally adopted to describe New Zealanders. Here a touring troupe of entertainers called the Kiwi Concert Party perform beneath the kiwi symbol of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force at El Alamein ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Gamelan orchestra

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The unique sound of the gamelan (Indonesian percussion music) has been compared to ‘moonlight and flowing water’. In November 2004 Victoria University of Wellington’s Javanese gamelan orchestra, Padhang Moncar, performed in St Paul’s Cathedral. ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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A returned Kiwi, Dunedin, 1980s

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Michael Lovell-Smith lived in Australia as a child, and on his return to New Zealand in 1979 continued to support Australia in sports events. Many Kiwi children are born to the hundreds of thousands of New Zealanders living in Australia or the United ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Choir of the Congregational Christian Church, Grey Lynn, Auckland

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Singing has always been an important aspect of worship for Samoan Christians. Here a Samoan choir sings an extract from ‘Le maota i le lagi’ (The house of peace in heaven). The choir, pictured here, is from the Congregational Christian Church, ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Albert Wendt

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

As a pioneering Samoan novelist and the first Pacific Island professor in New Zealand, Albert Wendt made a major contribution to exploring questions of Pacific Island and Samoan identity. Here he reads some of his poetry.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Te Vaka

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Listen to a segment of a song from the successful Tokelauan band Te Vaka. The pate (log drums) maintain Pacific timbres and beats, forming the backdrop to their songs. They sing of Tokelau’s history and address diverse themes, from the Peruvian ‘...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Tongan overstayers

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In the 1960s and 1970s many Tongans stayed on beyond their three-month work permit. In 1974 the New Zealand government announced an amnesty: they were to return to Tonga by a set time or be arrested. In this interview the Tongan lawyer Clive Edwards ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Cymanfa ganu

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The Welsh are renowned for their singing and for musical events that have helped keep their language alive. Their reputation for singing is at least a thousand years old, but the cymanfa ganu – communal singing of hymns in parts – dates back only to the...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Remembering Johnny Jones

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Mr A. Eccles, grandson of whaler and businessman Johnny Jones, recalls his forebear's enterprises at Waikouaiti in the 1830s and 1840s. Jones developed a farm at Matanaka, near Waikouaiti; some of the buildings are shown here. Sound file from ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Longest place name in the world

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

A hill near the coastal settlement of Pōrangahau is believed to have the longest place name in the world. The name is sung at the start of this waiata (song) and is followed by an account – in Māori – of the story behind it of the explorer Tamatea, who climbed the hill and played ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Power cuts

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Power cuts, common after the Second World War, made New Zealanders return to old habits and take on new ones. This photograph shows people queuing to buy kerosene lamps during power restrictions in 1956. The lamps had been the standard source of light in New Zealand homes until the early 20th ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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The Corriedale sheep

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Listen to the memories of James Little, the South Island sheep farmer who first bred the Corriedale sheep to suit New Zealand conditions. Corriedales were later farmed in large numbers overseas. Sound file from Radio New Zealand Sound Archives Ng...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Specials and stonethrowers, 1913

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Baton-wielding special constables (volunteer mounted police) confront stone-throwing strikers on Wellington’s Jervois Quay during the 1913 waterfront strike. Listen to Wellingtonian George Davies talk about the strike. Davies was a young boy when he took part in running battles with mounted...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Douglas Copland

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This caricature of New Zealand economist Douglas Copland comes from the University of Melbourne where he taught in the 1920s and 1930s. Listen to Copland talking in 1959 about his views of the level of aid required to assist developing countries. Sound file from

Ministry for Culture and Heritage