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North Island kōkako

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Pureora Forest is home to the rare North Island kōkako. Large numbers of these native birds used to live in the North Island but deforestation has severely restricted their range. Small populations now exist in Pureora Forest, as well as the northern Urewera, Bay of Plenty and Northland. Listen ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Benneydale township

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Benneydale was a township purpose-built in 1940 to house the employees of the Mangapehi state coal mine. The mine was Benneydale’s reason for existence, so its closure after a fire in 1962 had a major, negative impact on the township. Listen to part of a 1983 radio documentary to ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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1951 waterfront dispute

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Some conservatives believed that the 1951 waterfront dispute was a communist plot to cripple New Zealand. It is a view supported by this Gordon Minhinnick cartoon, which shows the wharfies as a puppet operated by a puppeteer from the World Federation of Trade Unions, who also sports a Soviet ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Principles of the Treaty Deletion Bill 2006

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In 2006, when Winston Peters was leader of New Zealand First and a minister in the Labour-led government, his party sponsored a bill to delete references to 'the principles of the treaty' from legislation. Listen to this radio news clip to hear New Zealand First MP Doug Woolerton explaining why ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Centenary of the treaty signing, 1940

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The centenary of the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi was the occasion for colourful celebrations in many parts of the country. This photo shows the regatta at Waitangi itself, with Auckland mayor Ernest Davis's yacht Moerewa and a traditional war canoe with more than 100 paddlers. ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Promoting the Māori language

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Activist group Ngā Tamatoa emerged in the early 1970s to demand greater recognition for Māori issues and interests. Among these was that the Māori language should be taught in schools. A 30,000-signature petition supporting this aim was presented to Parliament in 1972 by Ngā Tamatoa ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Īnia Te Wīata singing

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

One 20th-century Ngāti Raukawa figure was the internationally known bass Īnia Te Wīata. Here he sings a Ngāti Raukawa song, ‘He puru tai tama’. Sound file from Īnia Te Wīata, [no-lexicon]Waiata Maori [/no-lexicon], compact disc,

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Tītahi’s chant

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Just before Captain James Cook’s arrival, Tītahi, a leader of Ngāti Whātua, prophesied that major change was about to occur in the region of Waitematā Harbour, pictured here with Rangitito in the distance. Wiremu Rēweti of Ngāti Whātua presents the chant. Here are the the ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Mokomoko’s pardon, 1993

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Wharehuia Milroy of Ngāi Tūhoe talks about the visit of the justice minister Doug Graham in 1993, to apologise to Te Whakatōhea and the descendants of Mokomoko. Mokomoko was wrongfully accused and hanged for the murder of the missionary, Carl Völkner, in 1865. Shown here is Hiona St ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Albert Wendt

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

As a pioneering Samoan novelist and the first Pacific Island professor in New Zealand, Albert Wendt made a major contribution to exploring questions of Pacific Island and Samoan identity. Here he reads some of his poetry.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Tongan overstayers

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In the 1960s and 1970s many Tongans stayed on beyond their three-month work permit. In 1974 the New Zealand government announced an amnesty: they were to return to Tonga by a set time or be arrested. In this interview the Tongan lawyer Clive Edwards discusses the panic caused by this announcement...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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The SS Earnslaw

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The SS Earnslaw, built in Dunedin in the early 1900s, first plied Lake Wakatipu in 1912. For 50 years it carried freight and people to and from remote lakeside settlements. Since the 1970s the ship has been used for scenic cruises. British composer Ron Goodwin wrote the ‘Earnslaw Steam ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Rook call

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Rooks have a distinctive harsh call, which makes them very unpopular with the human inhabitants of Hawke’s Bay. They are also skilled at stripping horticultural crops of their edible parts, elevating them to true pest status. Sound ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Ferdinand the bull

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Ferdinand the bull has been a Taranaki rugby mascot since the 1950s, and has appeared in a number of guises. This smoke-exhaling version is 'Big Ferdie',  built for a June 2005 match against the Lions. In the audio clip, Taranaki rugby supporters sing of Ferdinand’s talents, to the ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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‘Kiwis care’ march

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Listen to Tania Harris (centre) and other participants talk about the ‘Kiwis care’ march down Queen Street in 1981. Two of the speakers highlight a widely held public perception that industrial unrest was caused by expatriate British unionists – often called 'Pommie stirrers'.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Dunedin pipe band

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Dunedin was settled by Scots and was soon known as New Zealand’s Scottish city. This image continued to resonate in the 20th century. Here the Dunedin Ladies’ Scottish Pipe Band march past the city’s medical school in 1947. Listen to David Eggleton evoke the city’s ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Dalkon Shield cartoon

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In the 1980s the Dalkon Shield intra-uterine device (IUD) caused infections and in some cases sterility among New Zealand women. Many sought compensation. This cartoon, published in the feminist magazine Broadsheet in 1986, questions the motives of the manufacturers of the...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Kūmara whakapapa

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This whakapapa shows how the kūmara descends from Rongo-māui and Pani-tinaku. Its origin is referred to in this extract of the waiata 'Pō! Pō!', by Enoka Te Pakaru. In English it translates as: Pō! Pō! My son, Tama, is crying for food! Wait until it is ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Anthems in Māori: 'E te Atua tohungia te Kuini', 1897

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Two Māori versions of 'God save the Queen' appeared in 1860. This first officially sanctioned version was printed in 1897 on palm-sized cards for the Māori who accompanied Premier Richard Seddon to Queen Victoria's 60th jubilee celebrations in England. The translation was the work of Edward ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Wiremu Parker

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Wiremu Parker was New Zealand's first Māori news broadcaster, from 1943. Broadcasting in the Māori language, he became a household name in Māori communities throughout the country. Parker, of Ngāti Porou, was knowledgable in both the Māori and Pākehā worlds and fluent in Māori and English...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage