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Beeville

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

A resident picks apples at Beeville, near Morrinsville, in a 1970s photo by Ans Westra. Founded in 1933, the anarchist community of Beeville grew out of the extended family of Ray Hansen. Honey production provided a major part of the community's income – hence the name Beeville. ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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'Paikea'

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Listen to the song 'Paikea', recorded at the 1964 Gisborne annual Māori competitions. In this version Paikea, a Ngāti Porou ancestor, is encouraged to 'hug' the daughter of Te Whironui (E awhi tō ringa ki te tamāhine a Te Whironui). In the original version Paikea is encouraged to procreate ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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School milk

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Free milk was provided to school children from 1937 to 1967. These children are drinking their milk in about 1939. Listen to comedian John Clarke's funny take on school milk, in the persona of farmer Fred Dagg. Sound file courtesy of John Clarke

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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New Zealand Prostitutes' Collective premises

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The former Wellington premises of the New Zealand Prostitutes' Collective (NZPC), seen here in 1988, signals the collective's commitment to safe-sex practices in the array of posters displayed in its window. Inside, pamphlets for sex workers are available and a comfortable couch ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Dementia care

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

While there are specialist residential services for people with dementia, many are cared for at home by family members – often, as in this case, an elderly spouse. When this photograph was taken in 2010, Bev (76) had been suffering from dementia for the previous three years, and had been ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Family Care Radio

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Family Care Radio was an internet radio show and website for carers and those they cared for, which operated in 2008 and 2009. Its monthly programmes included regular features on legal issues, continence management, safety in the home, and managing health and stress. The programme for September ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Hay barn, Sunburst ohu

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

A dog, a rooster and several residents mill around the Sunburst community's hay barn. Sunburst received government approval under the ohu scheme in 1974, and was the first ohu to be established. Residents – a loose group of friends who had lived together in Auckland and the Hokianga &ndash...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Different desires

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Mary Brennan works as a dominatrix under the name Mistress Mariah, at her BDSM (bondage, discipline and sado-masochism) salon in Lower Hutt. A dominatrix is a female sex worker who specialises in bondage and discipline (both physical and psychological). This does not usually involve sexual ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Michael Joseph Savage's victory speech, 1935

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

'Now then, ladies and gentlemen.' In the era before television, the reassuring tones of Michael Joseph Savage, the first Labour prime minister, became familiar to the entire country through radio broadcasts. On 27 November 1935, soon after Labour's historic victory in the general election, Savage...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Chico the cockatoo

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Although there is now a population of wild sulphur-crested cockatoos, they were originally brought to New Zealand as caged birds and some, such as Chico, are tethered pets. Chico perched on owner Robert Nelson’s shoulder while he cycled around Lower Hutt ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Kookaburra

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This Australian kookaburra looks at home perching on another Australian import – a eucalyptus tree. Sound file from the Department of Conservation.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Nesting white-backed magpies

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Magpies were introduced from Australia. They normally nest in exotic trees, like this pair in a pine. They are found throughout the North Island and in most parts of the South Island, except Central Otago and the northern and southern tips of the West Coast. They have entered the national ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Cardigan Bay

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Along with Phar Lap, Cardigan Bay is one of New Zealand’s most famous racehorses. Cardigan Bay was a Standardbred harness racer. In harness racing the horse pulls a two-wheeled cart, or sulky, which seats the driver. Cardigan Bay lived from 1956 to 1988, ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Yellowhammer with chicks

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Yellowhammers feed their young in nests that are usually close to the ground in gorse, bracken or long grass.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Rooks

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Rooks have a fierce beak and glossy feathers. The rook is the only member of the crow family in New Zealand, as the two endemic New Zealand ravens are now extinct. Sound file from the Department of Conservation

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Male house sparrow

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Despite its small size, the house sparrow is probably the worst bird pest from a farmer’s perspective. Its short bill is adapted for eating seeds, and in New Zealand it feeds on grain crops such as wheat, barley and maize. The male has a distinctive ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Archaeologist Bruce McFadgen

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Bruce McFadgen explains why radiocarbon dating of bones of recently dead rats from Lake Taupō has produced dates as long ago as 2,000 years ago – dates which are obviously not giving the true age of the rats. Sound file from Te Ara – The Encyclopedia of ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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The Waipāoa River

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Listen to this extract from the waiata (song) ‘Ka haramai a Pāoa’. It describes an incident following the arrival of the Horouta canoe which explains the origin of the Waipāoa River (pictured). When the Horouta was damaged on a reef, it was hauled ashore and the ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Douglas Lilburn's childhood home

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

As a child, composer Douglas Lilburn lived at Drysdale, a sheep station in the upper Turakina valley – a place which he later described as a paradise, and which was to inspire his Drysdale Overture. Sound file from Radio New Zealand...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Īnia Te Wīata singing

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

One 20th-century Ngāti Raukawa figure was the internationally known bass Īnia Te Wīata. Here he sings a Ngāti Raukawa song, ‘He puru tai tama’. Sound file from Īnia Te Wīata, [no-lexicon]Waiata Maori [/no-lexicon], compact disc,

Ministry for Culture and Heritage