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Patricia Winton, American immigrant

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Pat Winton came to New Zealand in 1959 to work for the American embassy in Wellington. She later married a New Zealander, had two children, and in 1995 took out dual New Zealand–United States citizenship. Listen to Pat talk about the differences between the New Zealand and American ways of ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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A returned Kiwi, Dunedin, 1980s

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Michael Lovell-Smith lived in Australia as a child, and on his return to New Zealand in 1979 continued to support Australia in sports events. Many Kiwi children are born to the hundreds of thousands of New Zealanders living in Australia or the United Kingdom. Families often return to New Zealand...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Choir of the Congregational Christian Church, Grey Lynn, Auckland

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Singing has always been an important aspect of worship for Samoan Christians. Here a Samoan choir sings an extract from ‘Le maota i le lagi’ (The house of peace in heaven). The choir, pictured here, is from the Congregational Christian Church, Grey Lynn in Auckland.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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A woollen-mill worker’s story

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Scottish mill workers played an important role in developing New Zealand’s wool industry over many years. Marie Jarvis, from Hawick, had experience in the mills of her hometown when she decided to move with her family to Otago, to work in a mill founded in the 19th century by two Scots, ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Cymanfa ganu

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The Welsh are renowned for their singing and for musical events that have helped keep their language alive. Their reputation for singing is at least a thousand years old, but the cymanfa ganu – communal singing of hymns in parts – dates back only to the 19th century temperance ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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The Waipāoa River

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Listen to this extract from the waiata (song) ‘Ka haramai a Pāoa’. It describes an incident following the arrival of the Horouta canoe which explains the origin of the Waipāoa River (pictured). When the Horouta was damaged on a reef, it was hauled ashore and the ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Remembering Johnny Jones

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Mr A. Eccles, grandson of whaler and businessman Johnny Jones, recalls his forebear's enterprises at Waikouaiti in the 1830s and 1840s. Jones developed a farm at Matanaka, near Waikouaiti; some of the buildings are shown here. Sound file from ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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The SS Earnslaw

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The SS Earnslaw, built in Dunedin in the early 1900s, first plied Lake Wakatipu in 1912. For 50 years it carried freight and people to and from remote lakeside settlements. Since the 1970s the ship has been used for scenic cruises. British composer Ron Goodwin wrote the ‘Earnslaw Steam ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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The Kurahaupō canoe

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The photograph shows a replica of the Kurahaupō canoe. The tribes of Muaūpoko and Rangitāne share the belief that Whātonga was the captain of the canoe. In the song Darren Reid of Muaūpoko tells of the voyage of the canoe and the quest of Whātonga to find his grandfather, the ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Landing places of South Island canoes

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This map shows the landing places of the Ārai-te-uru and Tākitimu canoes and the passage of the Uruaokapuarangi canoe, captained by Rākaihautū. In the sound file, Ngāi Tahu leader Sir Tīpene O’Regan tells the story of the arrival of Rākaihautū and his son ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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‘Te ihi o Kurahaupō’

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This photograph shows a replica of the Kurahaupō, which brought the ancestors of the Muaūpoko people to New Zealand. ‘Te ihi o Kurahaupō’, a waiata (song) by Darren Reid, tells of the voyage of the Kurahaupō canoe, and the quest of its captain Whātonga ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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‘I hoki mai Te Whenuanui i te aha’

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This pātere (abusive song) was composed by the widows of Tūhoe men who fell at the battle of Ōrākau in April 1864. When the survivors returned to Ruatāhuna, they were assailed on the marae with this song, a virulent outburst at the waste of so many Tūhoe. The rangatira Te Whenuanui, who led...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Chant composed by Te Rauparaha

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Ngāti Toa chief Te Rauparaha, pictured here, composed the ngeri (chant with actions) which you can hear performed by members of Ngāti Toa. The words are set out below. This chant, which is not often performed, forms the start of the famous haka composed by Te Rauparaha –‘Ka mate, ka...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Te Tō Waka, the canoe portage

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Te Tō Waka, the narrow stretch of land between the Tāmaki River and the Manukau Harbour, was used extensively by Māori as they travelled between the east and west coasts. Listen to the traditional chant used by the Tainui people while they dragged their canoes across the isthmus. Today the ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Tītahi’s chant

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Just before Captain James Cook’s arrival, Tītahi, a leader of Ngāti Whātua, prophesied that major change was about to occur in the region of Waitematā Harbour, pictured here with Rangitito in the distance. Wiremu Rēweti of Ngāti Whātua presents the chant. Here are the the ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Parihaka gatherings

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This gathering of people at Parihaka was photographed in the 1880s. Such events have been taking place since the Taranaki wars of the 1860s. At that time the Parihaka leaders Te Whiti-o-Rongomai and Tohu Kākahi set up a regular forum called Tekau mā waru (‘The Eighteenth’) which ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Betty Meyer, Scottish immigrant

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Betty Meyer emigrated to New Zealand from Hawick in the Borders country of Scotland in 1952 at the age of 16. She came with her parents who had been sponsored by a Dunedin woollen factory. In this interview she explains why her parents decided to leave Hawick for Dunedin.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Proof of Spanish discovery?

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Some have speculated that Spanish or Portuguese ships reached New Zealand, or became wrecked on its coast, before Abel Tasman’s arrival in 1642. This ‘Spanish helmet’, allegedly fished out of Wellington Harbour, is seen by some as proof that the Spanish did reach New Zealand. ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Interview with Samoan overstayer

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

During the 1990s people were streaming into New Zealand, particularly from Asia, Africa and the Middle East. There was not a huge increase of Pacific Islanders during this decade, and in fact a few Pacific Islanders were deported for overstaying their temporary residence permits. This Samoan ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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A Zimbabwean talks about home

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Immigrant Peter Baldwin, who arrived in New Zealand with his family in 2000, talks about Robert Mugabe’s government and the family’s reasons for leaving Zimbabwe.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage