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Anthems in Māori: 'E te Atua tohungia te Kuini', 1897

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Two Māori versions of 'God save the Queen' appeared in 1860. This first officially sanctioned version was printed in 1897 on palm-sized cards for the Māori who accompanied Premier Richard Seddon to Queen Victoria's 60th jubilee celebrations in England. The translation was the work of Edward ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Norman 'Big Norm' Kirk

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

‘Norm is the fairy on our Christmas tree/handing out presents to the elderly’ were lines from the tongue-in-cheek tune ‘Big Norm’ that Wellington pop duo Ebony took to number four in the charts. The song stuck in people’s minds and featured on this tribute album ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Wiremu Parker

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Wiremu Parker was New Zealand's first Māori news broadcaster, from 1943. Broadcasting in the Māori language, he became a household name in Māori communities throughout the country. Parker, of Ngāti Porou, was knowledgable in both the Māori and Pākehā worlds and fluent in Māori and English...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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The Pike River mine explosion inquiry

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Flame and smoke billow from the Pike River coal mine, near Greymouth. In November 2010, 29 miners died after two methane explosions and a fire in the mine. In this sound file, Prime Minister John Key announces a royal commission of inquiry into the tragedy. Commissions of inquiry are one way of ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Sidney Holland

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Prime Minister Sidney Holland lays a wreath at the Wellington cenotaph during Anzac Day ceremonies in 1950. Holland was a staunch supporter of the British Empire, something he emphasises in this clip from his 1951 election victory speech. Sound file from

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Patriotic song

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

‘Sons of the colonies’ was one of many patriotic songs which were composed to drum up New Zealanders’ support for participation in the South African War. The lyrics include the words: Sons of the Colonies, Loyal to motherland, Show Britain's enemies

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Radio operators at Mount Etako station, Tinakori Hill, 1912

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

At the outbreak of war in 1914 the Post Office's coastal radio Morse stations were taken over by the navy. The Post Office radio operators continued to work the stations, listening for enemy Morse-code messages. The relatively small amount of radio traffic in the 1910s meant that messages could ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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1951 waterfront dispute

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Some conservatives believed that the 1951 waterfront dispute was a communist plot to cripple New Zealand. It is a view supported by this Gordon Minhinnick cartoon, which shows the wharfies as a puppet operated by a puppeteer from the World Federation of Trade Unions, who also sports a Soviet ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Māori Battalion march to victory!

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The song 'Māori Battalion' was adopted as the battalion's marching song. It was also a popular radio hit in New Zealand. The lyrics were written by Anania Amohau of Te Arawa, who served in B Company of the battalion. The image shows the battalion marching through the Volturno Valley area of ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Principles of the Treaty Deletion Bill 2006

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In 2006, when Winston Peters was leader of New Zealand First and a minister in the Labour-led government, his party sponsored a bill to delete references to 'the principles of the treaty' from legislation. Listen to this radio news clip to hear New Zealand First MP Doug Woolerton explaining why ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Eva Rickard, Raglan land occupation, 1978

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Tainui land rights activist Eva Rickard indicates her ancestral land on the Raglan harbour to Minister of Lands Venn Young. The government had claimed it for a military airfield during the Second World War and it later became a public golf course. Rickard and other members of her iwi were ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Crayfish boom

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In 1964 the main fish caught in Chatham Islands waters was cod. However, in 1968, 5,900 tonnes of crayfish were sent out from the islands, mostly overseas. Cod fisher Howard Page talks of the scene when he came down to hunt for crayfish about a year after the boom started. Sound file from...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Promoting the Māori language

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Activist group Ngā Tamatoa emerged in the early 1970s to demand greater recognition for Māori issues and interests. Among these was that the Māori language should be taught in schools. A 30,000-signature petition supporting this aim was presented to Parliament in 1972 by Ngā Tamatoa ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Radio journalists at work

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

John Scott worked for a time for the ‘rurals team’, which produced radio programmes on agricultural topics for nearly 40 years from the late 1950s. Listen to Scott’s recollections of learning the job, at a time when his New Zealand accent ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Thresher

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Threshing machines were used in New Zealand for more than 80 years, finally declining in use in the mid-1940s. Forerunners of combine harvesters, they separated the grain of crops such as wheat and oats. Listen to Jack Perkins in his radio show ‘From the...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Kūmara whakapapa

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This kūmara whakapapa (genealogy) shows how kūmara is descended from Rongo-māui and Pani-tinaku. Listen to an extract from Pō! Pō!, a waiata (song) by Enoka Te Pakaru, which refers to the origin of the kūmara. It translates into English as: Pō! Pō! My son, Tama...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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School on the radio

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Kathryn Stirling of Glentanner Station, Canterbury, tunes in to a radio programme as part of a correspondence lesson in the early 1950s. The Correspondence School broadcast its lessons between 1937 and 1997. Listen to the first Māori-language programme of ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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The language of mustering

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Sheep mustering on horseback with dogs in the South Island high country has led to a wide range of terms to describe the work, clothing and lifestyle. Listen to John Gordon discussing the colourful language of mustering. Sound file from

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Produce auction

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Jack Forsyth of Turners and Growers talks about the busy scene in the wholesale produce markets when an auction was in full swing. In this picture the auctioneer is the man bending over his price sheets at the back. The man on the right is making a bid. The other potential bidders are inspecting ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Disaster at Hyde

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Onlookers view the crumpled carriages after the Cromwell–Dunedin express came to grief near the town of Hyde on 4 June 1943. The train, which was travelling too fast, derailed on a corner and the carriages piled into each other. Many people were injured, and 24 were killed. Listen ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage