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Aunt Daisy

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Maud Basham, or ‘Aunt Daisy’ as she was known to her radio audience, established her reputation on a daily morning show on commercial radio, soon after the National Commercial Broadcasting Service was established in 1937. In a breathless...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Support for Radio Hauraki

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In 1966 Radio Hauraki began to broadcast from a ship outside New Zealand waters, so as to circumvent the restrictions on commercial radio. With its focus on popular music, the station quickly attracted a youthful audience – as can be seen in ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Ron Brierley, 1970

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Ron Brierley, born in 1937, established his investment firm Brierley Investments Ltd (BIL) in 1961. He invested in companies with low share prices and valuable assets. His style of corporate raiding was not always welcomed by the stock exchange, which in the late 1960s refused to list BIL. ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Cycle couriers

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Keeping an eye on overtaking vehicles, Wellington cycle courier Tom Finlay heads back to base after a delivery in 1990. Cycle couriers are often the fastest means of mail and document delivery in inner-city areas. Their daring and even dangerous riding style has given them the nickname ‘...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Rural delivery mail

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The many small farming settlements in New Zealand have relied on the rural delivery service for over a hundred years. This farmer in the Ruapehu district clears the newspapers, letters and parcels in his rural delivery mailbox, in the 1940s. Listen to rural delivery man Doug Wilson talk ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Douglas Copland

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This caricature of New Zealand economist Douglas Copland comes from the University of Melbourne where he taught in the 1920s and 1930s. Listen to Copland talking in 1959 about his views of the level of aid required to assist developing countries. Sound file from

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Tainui waka landing place

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

When the Tainui waka (canoe) finally arrived at Kāwhia after its long journey, it was tied to this pōhutukawa tree, called Tangi-te-korowhiti. Listen to Tita Wētere tell the story of the building of the canoe. Sound file from Radio New ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Giant kauri

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This giant kauri is found at Waiau Falls scenic reserve on the Coromandel Peninsula, not far from Coromandel town. The reserve is part of one of the few unlogged stands found on the peninsula. Listen to Canon Pāora Temuera of Ngāti Raukawa and Te Arawa recite a karakia (prayer) that would once ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Kathy Dunstall, Howard League activist

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Kathy Dunstall has been secretary of the Canterbury branch of the Howard League for Penal Reform for many years, and is a major spokesperson for the League. Listen to an extract from a June 2010 radio interview about her work as an advocate for prisoners' rights. Dunstall highlights the ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Romanian children in New Zealand

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Sam, Emma and Elsie, seen at a Wellington play group in 1992, were born in Romania and adopted by New Zealanders. Listen to Department of Social Welfare advisor Paula Dickens talk about the criteria prospective parents need to meet before adopting a child from another country. Sound file ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Dalkon Shield cartoon

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In the 1980s the Dalkon Shield intra-uterine device (IUD) caused infections and in some cases sterility among New Zealand women. Many sought compensation. This cartoon, published in the feminist magazine Broadsheet in 1986, questions the motives of the manufacturers of the...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Kūmara whakapapa

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This kūmara whakapapa tells how kūmara is descended from Rongo-māui and Pani-tinaku. Whakapapa was integral to the Māori world view – humans, gods and the whole natural world shared genealogical links. Listen to part of 'Pō! Pō!', by Enoka Te Pakaru, which refers to the ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Bombing Bertie the germ

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

'Bertie the germ' was a constant focus of attention in Department of Health advertisements aimed at children in the 1940s and 1950s. Cleaning your teeth and eating fresh fruit and vegetables were a way of keeping Bertie the germ at bay and avoiding tooth decay. In this poster, developed ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Uncle Scrim

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Colin Scrimgeour, known as 'Uncle Scrim', was a Methodist missioner whose Friendly road radio programme was hugely popular during the economic depression in the early 1930s. This 1931 cartoon by Gordon Minhinnick shows him as a rather cunning angel. Listen to Uncle Scrim talking about the ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Home schooling, 1948

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

During a polio epidemic in 1948 children were kept home from school to prevent the disease spreading. This cartoon shows a busy mother trying to do the housework and mind the baby while supervising her children's studies. While healthy children appreciated the time off school because it ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Influenza instructions to nurses

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This poster, published by the New Plymouth Public Health Committee, gives detailed instructions to those nursing influenza patients in 1918. Cases are divided into mild, serious, extreme and delirium. Listen to people who lived through the pandemic describing flu patients suffering from delirium...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Hay barn, Sunburst ohu

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

A dog, a rooster and several residents mill around the Sunburst community's hay barn. Sunburst received government approval under the ohu scheme in 1974, and was the first ohu to be established. Residents – a loose group of friends who had lived together in Auckland and the Hokianga &ndash...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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'His name is higher', with David and Dale Garratt

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In 1974 New Zealand charismatic Christian pastors David and Dale Garratt held huge outdoor meetings at racetracks in Palmerston North and Tauranga. Each was attended by about 3,000 people and the Garratts led them in singing devotional songs. These were recorded and later released as ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Freda Stark

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Freda Stark (left) had many lesbian relationships throughout her life. She met actress Thelma Trott (centre) in 1933 and the pair became lovers. The relationship continued after Thelma married conductor Eric Mareo (right), and Freda was a regular guest in the couple's home. Thelma Mareo died in ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Mother Aubert's Paramo

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Catholic nun Suzanne Aubert made herbal remedies from native plants to treat Māori patients. Her remedies were sold commercially in the 1890s. They were packaged in colourful boxes printed with Aubert's image, which was intended to suggest they were trustworthy and reliable. Listen to ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage