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Uncle Scrim

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Colin Scrimgeour, known as 'Uncle Scrim', was a Methodist missioner whose Friendly road radio programme was hugely popular during the economic depression in the early 1930s. This 1931 cartoon by Gordon Minhinnick shows him as a rather cunning angel. Listen to Uncle Scrim talking about the ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Dementia care

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

While there are specialist residential services for people with dementia, many are cared for at home by family members – often, as in this case, an elderly spouse. When this photograph was taken in 2010, Bev (76) had been suffering from dementia for the previous three years, and had been ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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With Britain in time of war

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

For most New Zealanders, commitment to Britain did not depend on their political beliefs – both conservative and reform-minded New Zealanders saw themselves as part of Britain's colonial family. In this 1939 radio broadcast, Prime Minister Michael Joseph Savage affirms that relationship on ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Speaker of the House of Representatives

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In 2004 the Speaker of the House of Representatives was Jonathan Hunt, photographed here beside artist Ryuzo Mishida’s portrait of him. The Speaker, who is elected by MPs, determines the proceedings of the House and keeps order. He is also responsible for parliamentary expenditure and ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Boy reading Jack and Jill magazine, 1959

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Comics were hugely popular with children and young people in the 1950s. This young boy in school uniform is reading the American children's magazine Jack and Jill, which included comics. The back page is devoted to the Tiny tales comic strip.  Cowboys had long ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Corrupting comics, 1957

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In the 1950s criticism of the supposedly corrupting influence of comics gathered steam, and they came under the purview of indecent publications legislation. In 1956 the government set up a special comics advisory committee which had the power to ban the import of comics. This is Minister of ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Lodge Laughs – rugby, racing and beer

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Nevile Lodge contributed his 'Lodge Laughs' cartoons to the Evening Post from 1947 to 1988. While he often dealt with political events, Lodge Laughs were best known for their commentary on New Zealand society. Lodge was particularly adept at portraying the 'rugby, racing and ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Alan Moir, Kiwi cartoonist in Sydney

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

New Zealander Alan Moir, working in Australia from the 1970s, was still producing cartoons for the Sydney Morning Herald in 2013. His 1986 cartoon on the ANZUS alliance suggested that New Zealand, represented by Prime Minister David Lange (centre), was not playing its part. ANZUS was now...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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'Min' – Gordon Minhinnick

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Gordon Minhinnick, known as 'Min', was the pre-eminent New Zealand cartoonist from the mid-1930s through to the 1960s. Despite 'retiring' in 1976, he continued having cartoons published until 1987. In the accompanying sound clip Minhinnick discusses the 'corrosive'  ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Russell Coutts, professional yachtsman

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

New Zealand sailor Russell Coutts is shown here in 2009 at the wheel of a US yacht, which as part of the BMW Oracle team, he skippered in the Louis Vuitton Pacific Series of that year. Coutts had been hired by US billionaire Larry Ellison to head a team to win the 2010 America's Cup. In 1995 ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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'To a Maori figure cast in bronze outside the chief post office, Auckland'

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

A larger-than-life Māori statue by Molly McAlister was erected in downtown Auckland in 1967. Five years later Hone Tuwhare wrote a poem addressed to the statue, mixing Māori language with everyday English ('your balls, mate'). Listen to Tuwhare reading this poem, one of the funniest ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Crystal Palace, Auckland

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The Crystal Palace (shown here in 1986) was one of Auckland's busiest clubs in the 1930s, drawing crowds to hear Epi Shalfoon and the Melody Boys – a band that acted as a training ground for many Auckland musicians. The Crystal Palace was revived in the 1950s by promoter Phil Warren, ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Arnold Wall

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Arnold Wall was a literary scholar at the University of Canterbury. After his retirement in 1932 he wrote a series of columns titled 'Our mother tongue' for the Press newspaper. Wall was highly critical of New Zealand pronunciation in these columns and in his book New Zealand ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Oriori for Ahuahukiterangi

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This is Tokomaru Bay on the East Coast of the North Island. It was sung about in this oriori (song for a child) which was composed by East Coast ancestress Hinekitawhiti for her mokopuna (granddaughter) Ahuahukiterangi who lived at Ariuru in Tokomaru. In the song the grandmother bids her ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Fourth test, 1956

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The final test against South Africa at Eden Park, Auckland, in 1956 was an epic game for New Zealand rugby supporters. The All Blacks were leading 2–1 in the first series against South Africa, since they had been beaten 4–0 in South Africa in 1949. There was a huge crowd of 61,240, ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Pink Pussycat club

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Rainton Hastie, owner of the Pink Pussycat strip club in Karangahape Road, Auckland, can be heard in this 1973 radio programme. The segment begins with Hastie talking to a potential employee, and then outlining the steps to full nudity on stage.  

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Acronyms

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Many new words have been generated in the form of abbreviations and acronyms – especially from the names of government agencies. Work and Income, the employment and income support division of the Ministry of Social Development, was previously and widely known as WINZ, an abbreviation of ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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'I'm absolutely buggered'

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In 1956 All Black Peter Jones earned himself a place in history, not just for his rugby playing, but for words uttered after a test match win over South Africa's Springboks. Straight after the game, Jones told a radio journalist – in true Kiwi bloke form – 'I'm absolutely ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Earnslaw on Lake Wakatipu

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The Earnslaw is a steamer that was built in Dunedin in the early 1900s, and launched on Lake Wakatipu in 1912. For over 50 years the boat carried people and freight to and from remote communities around the lake, but since the 1970s it has been mainly used for scenic cruises. ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Juvenile tuatara

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Researchers at Victoria University of Wellington keep tuatara in enclosures, in semi-natural conditions, for up to five years after they hatch. Safe from predators, these juveniles have a higher survival rate than hatchlings in the wild. They will eventually return to their home island, or will ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage