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Māori Battalion march to victory!

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The song 'Māori Battalion' was adopted as the battalion's marching song. It was also a popular radio hit in New Zealand. The lyrics were written by Anania Amohau of Te Arawa, who served in B Company of the battalion. The image shows the battalion marching through the Volturno Valley area of ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Anti-tour march, 1981

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Banner-bearing protestors filled the streets of New Zealand on numerous occasions in 1981. In that year, for the first time since 1965, the government agreed to a tour by a racially-selected Springbok team. These banners in Wellington's Willis Street indicate that the tour was opposed by a broad ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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East Coast oriori

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Listen to this extract from an oriori, or traditional song for a young child, composed by Hinekitawhiti, an East Coast woman of mana, for her mokopuna (granddaughter) Ahuahukiterangi, who lived at Ariuru in Tokomaru. In the song the grandmother bids her granddaughter call on her relatives from ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Kūmara whakapapa

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This whakapapa shows how the kūmara descends from Rongo-māui and Pani-tinaku. Its origin is referred to in this extract of the waiata 'Pō! Pō!', by Enoka Te Pakaru. In English it translates as: Pō! Pō! My son, Tama, is crying for food! Wait until it is fetched from the...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Different desires

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Mary Brennan works as a dominatrix under the name Mistress Mariah, at her BDSM (bondage, discipline and sado-masochism) salon in Lower Hutt. A dominatrix is a female sex worker who specialises in bondage and discipline (both physical and psychological). This does not usually involve sexual ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Pros and cons of sex work: Anna Reed

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Anna Reed has been the Canterbury regional coordinator for the New Zealand Prostitutes' Collective since the late 1980s, and still held the position in 2010. Reed, pictured here in the 1980s, talks about why she enjoyed sex work. While many sex workers do not experience pleasure with ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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North Island kōkako

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Pureora Forest is home to the rare North Island kōkako. Large numbers of these native birds used to live in the North Island but deforestation has severely restricted their range. Small populations now exist in Pureora Forest, as well as the northern Urewera, Bay of Plenty and Northland. Listen ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Taumarunui on the main trunk line

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Taumarunui was the archetypal railway town and was a refreshment stop for passenger trains on the main trunk line as they travelled up and down the North Island. This is the main street, Hakiaha Street (and State Highway 4), and the railway line in 1913, 10 years after the line reached the town. ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Wiremu Parker

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Wiremu Parker was New Zealand's first Māori news broadcaster, from 1943. Broadcasting in the Māori language, he became a household name in Māori communities throughout the country. Parker, of Ngāti Porou, was knowledgable in both the Māori and Pākehā worlds and fluent in Māori and English...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Radio operators at Mount Etako station, Tinakori Hill, 1912

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

At the outbreak of war in 1914 the Post Office's coastal radio Morse stations were taken over by the navy. The Post Office radio operators continued to work the stations, listening for enemy Morse-code messages. The relatively small amount of radio traffic in the 1910s meant that messages could ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Crayfish boom

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In 1964 the main fish caught in Chatham Islands waters was cod. However, in 1968, 5,900 tonnes of crayfish were sent out from the islands, mostly overseas. Cod fisher Howard Page talks of the scene when he came down to hunt for crayfish about a year after the boom started. Sound file from...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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North Island kōkako

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The calls of the kōkako cannot be compared with those of any other bird. Haunting and evocative, they are gently paced, wistful tunes, sung in rich flute-like tones. Males and females sing duets. Within a given area, birds have their own dialect, which tends to drive away those from outside. ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Bellbirds

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

It is easy to identify the melodious call of the bellbird (korimako) in the forest. Their dialect or tune varies from one valley to another, but they all have the same rich tones. Sound file from Birds of New Zealand. Compact disc. © Viking Sevenseas NZ, 1980 (PO Box 152, ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Tūī drinking nectar

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The tūī reaches the nectar in a flax flower with its curved beak, extending its brush-tipped tongue. Its fine feathers above the bill become coated with yellow pollen, and the tūī then transfers pollen from one flower to another. Sound file from Birds of New Zealand. Compact ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Grey warbler

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Grey warblers (riroriro) use cobwebs, lichen, twigs and leaves to build enclosed nests with a side entrance. As well as native forests, they have adapted to living in pine forests and well-planted urban gardens. Their trilling call is a familiar sign of spring. Sound file from Birds of...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Male and female paradise shelduck

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

A paradise shelduck pair usually stays close together, each bird calling in turn as they move about. The male’s call is deeper than the female’s. The female has a white head, whereas the male’s head is glossy green-black. Like other shelducks they have a long goose-like neck.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Kingfisher in flight

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The speed of a kingfisher or kōtare when diving on moving prey is legendary. This one is returning to its perch after catching food. They call from high lookouts with a distinctive ‘kek-kek-kek’ that carries afar. Close to the nest they make an unusual whirring call. Sound ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Shining cuckoo

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Shining cuckoos (pīpīwharauroa) return to New Zealand each spring after spending winter in the tropics. Like other cuckoos around the world, they lay their egg in the nest of another species and let the foster parents raise their chick. Despite this apparently easy existence their numbers ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Brakemen

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In 1904, this tramway at Maropiu, Northland, had such a steep grade it required a brakeman riding on each bogie (small cart). They both wound hand cranks that pressed board brakes onto the faces of each wheel. It was very dangerous work. On a nearby tram in that same year, a brakeman was crushed ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Muriel Fisher

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

During the 1950s and 1960s Muriel and Bill Fisher established a fine collection of over 700 native plants in their garden on the North Shore of Auckland Harbour. Concerned for the future of some rare plants, Muriel Fisher wrote Gardening with New Zealand plants, shrubs and trees to ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage