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Split Enz

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

One of New Zealand’s greatest pop bands, Split Enz first performed in December 1972 and became the first New Zealand group to achieve worldwide success. When lead vocalist Tim Finn left to start a solo career in 1984, the band broke up. However, it still enjoys iconic status. Listen to ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Mākereti Papakura

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Listen to an audio clip from National Radio’s programme about Mākereti Papakura’s life, ‘Remembering Mākereti’. Born near Rotorua in 1873, she became a tourist guide at Whakarewarewa before travelling overseas and marrying a wealthy English farmer. In later life she ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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‘Te ihi o Kurahaupō’

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This photograph shows a replica of the Kurahaupō, which brought the ancestors of the Muaūpoko people to New Zealand. ‘Te ihi o Kurahaupō’, a waiata (song) by Darren Reid, tells of the voyage of the Kurahaupō canoe, and the quest of its captain Whātonga ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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The Waipāoa River

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This extract from the waiata (song) ‘Ka haramai a Pāoa’ explains some of the history of the arrival of the Horouta canoe. Notably, it gives an account of how the Waipāoa River (pictured) was formed. Sound file from Radio New...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Mokomoko’s pardon, 1993

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Wharehuia Milroy of Ngāi Tūhoe talks about the visit of the justice minister Doug Graham in 1993, to apologise to Te Whakatōhea and the descendants of Mokomoko. Mokomoko was wrongfully accused and hanged for the murder of the missionary, Carl Völkner, in 1865. Shown here is Hiona St ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Gamelan orchestra

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The unique sound of the gamelan (Indonesian percussion music) has been compared to ‘moonlight and flowing water’. In November 2004 Victoria University of Wellington’s Javanese gamelan orchestra, Padhang Moncar, performed in St Paul’s Cathedral. Listen to Padhang Moncar in ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Longest place name in the world

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

A hill near the coastal settlement of Pōrangahau is believed to have the longest place name in the world. The name is sung at the start of this waiata (song) and is followed by an account – in Māori – of the story behind it of the explorer Tamatea, who climbed the hill and played ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Support for Radio Hauraki

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In 1966 Radio Hauraki began to broadcast from a ship outside New Zealand waters, so as to circumvent the restrictions on commercial radio. With its focus on popular music, the station quickly attracted a youthful audience – as can be seen in ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Uncle Scrim

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Colin Scrimgeour, known as 'Uncle Scrim', was a Methodist missioner whose Friendly road radio programme was hugely popular during the economic depression in the early 1930s. This 1931 cartoon by Gordon Minhinnick shows him as a rather cunning angel. Listen to Uncle Scrim talking about the ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Dementia care

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

While there are specialist residential services for people with dementia, many are cared for at home by family members – often, as in this case, an elderly spouse. When this photograph was taken in 2010, Bev (76) had been suffering from dementia for the previous three years, and had been ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Parihaka

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Mt Taranaki forms a dramatic backdrop to the established settlement of Parihaka, painted by George Clarendon Beale around 1881. In the 1870s Parihaka became a centre for peaceful resistance to the land confiscations that followed the Taranaki wars of the previous decade. Populated by followers of...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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'His name is higher', with David and Dale Garratt

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In 1974 New Zealand charismatic Christian pastors David and Dale Garratt held huge outdoor meetings at racetracks in Palmerston North and Tauranga. Each was attended by about 3,000 people and the Garratts led them in singing devotional songs. These were recorded and later released as ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Te Kore whakapapa

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In Māori cosmology creation is detailed as a whakapapa, which outlines the numerous generations of Te Kore (the void), Te Pō (the night) and Te Ao (the day).

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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School milk

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Free milk was provided to school children from 1937 to 1967. These children are drinking their milk in about 1939. Listen to comedian John Clarke's funny take on school milk, in the persona of farmer Fred Dagg. Sound file courtesy of John Clarke

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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South Auckland poetry

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Pacific Island words and voices are among the predominant sounds of South Auckland, and are reflected in the creative life of its community. In his poem ‘In a village’, South Auckland Poets Collective member Daren Kamali reflects on the power of the homeland for Pacific Islanders who ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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With Britain in time of war

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

For most New Zealanders, commitment to Britain did not depend on their political beliefs – both conservative and reform-minded New Zealanders saw themselves as part of Britain's colonial family. In this 1939 radio broadcast, Prime Minister Michael Joseph Savage affirms that relationship on ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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The language of mustering

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Sheep mustering on horseback with dogs in the South Island high country has led to a wide range of terms to describe the work, clothing and lifestyle. Listen to John Gordon discussing the colourful language of mustering. Sound file from

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Chico the cockatoo

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Although there is now a population of wild sulphur-crested cockatoos, they were originally brought to New Zealand as caged birds and some, such as Chico, are tethered pets. Chico perched on owner Robert Nelson’s shoulder while he cycled around Lower Hutt ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Eastern rosella

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The eastern rosella has a distinctive red head, which contrasts with its yellow underbelly, and its blue and green wings and tail. Rosellas are often seen in pairs or in small flocks. Sound file from the ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Little owl

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Originally introduced from Germany, little owls are now established in the South Island. They are found mainly in flat pastoral country, especially on the east coast, while the native morepork is found more commonly on the west coast.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage