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‘Dad and Dave’

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Australian values and attitudes came to New Zealand not just with the immigrants, but also via print, radio and television. ‘Dad and Dave’, an Australian radio serial about a rural family in Snake Gully, ran from 1937 to 1953 and had a large following. The fans included these two New ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Cathy Coleborne

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Cathy Coleborne is an Australian who has taught history at Waikato University since 1999. In New Zealand she has become a follower of rugby and rugby league, sports that are more popular in New Zealand than Victoria. In spite of the traditional rivalry between the two countries, she is a ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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John van Leeuwen

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In this interview for Echo Radio, John van Leeuwen describes his experiences on emigrating to New Zealand in 1953.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Joe Hawke

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Joe Hawke (left) lodged the first claim heard by the Waitangi Tribunal. It concerned the loss of tribal land at Takaparawhā (Bastion Point) in Auckland. In 1977 the tribunal rejected the claim. In this 1977 radio interview Hawke talks about why the issue was so important to his people of Ngāti ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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‘A new life in New Zealand’

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

From 1947 the New Zealand government once more provided assistance with fares for English migrants. Over the next 28 years more than 250,000 arrived, many paying their own way. This display in New Zealand House, London, shows the promises of a new life offered to prospective migrants. However the...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Yorkshire immigrants talk of work in New Zealand and at ‘home’

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In the 1920s there was an increase in immigrants from the more industrial areas of northern England, especially Yorkshire. One Yorkshire immigrant who arrived in 1927 was a man simply known as Mr Pearson. He had worked at a dockyard at South Bank-on-Tees. Here he and his wife discuss the ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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The Holy Trinity Cathedral choir, Auckland

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The Church of England was the strongest denomination in New Zealand, and an important vehicle for the transmission of English values. The choir of the Holy Trinity Cathedral in Auckland, pictured here in 1980, can be heard singing ‘Evening hymn’, composed by the Englishman Henry ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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‘Te ihi o Kurahaupō’

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This photograph shows a replica of the Kurahaupō, which brought the ancestors of the Muaūpoko people to New Zealand. ‘Te ihi o Kurahaupō’, a waiata (song) by Darren Reid, tells of the voyage of the Kurahaupō canoe, and the quest of its captain Whātonga ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Te Aute Maori Boys’ College

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Set up to educate young Māori from a community grant in 1854, Te Aute College (and subsequently its sister school Hukarere Maori Girls’ College) has produced many well-known Māori leaders. Hear students from Te Aute College perform the haka ‘Te Haka o Te Aute Kāreti’. This ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Speaker of the House of Representatives

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In 2004 the Speaker of the House of Representatives was Jonathan Hunt, photographed here beside artist Ryuzo Mishida’s portrait of him. The Speaker, who is elected by MPs, determines the proceedings of the House and keeps order. He is also responsible for parliamentary expenditure and ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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‘God defend New Zealand’

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

New Zealand is unusual in having two national anthems of equal standing – ‘God save the queen’ (or king), and the more recent ‘God defend New Zealand’. When a member of the royal family is present the former is preferred. However, increasingly on public occasions and...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Jonathan Lemalu

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Bass baritone Jonathan Fa‘afetai Lemalu is a New Zealander of Samoan descent. Since graduating from London’s Royal College of Music, where he won the gold medal in 2002, he has sung in recitals and opera in London and is fast gaining a world reputation. He is heard here performing ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Tower New Zealand Youth Choir

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Formed in 1979, the Tower New Zealand Youth Choir is pictured here at Gorizia, Italy, during its 2004 European tour. The choir has won many awards, including the title ‘Choir of the World’ at the International Musical Eisteddfod in Llangollen, Wales in 1999. Listen to the choir sing ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Te Au-o-Tonga and Te Aurere off the East Coast, 2000

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The successes of the Hōkūle‘a led to a renaissance in Polynesian navigation and the sailing of traditional craft. Other vessels were built. Te Aurere (right), pictured here with Te Au-o-Tonga, was built by Hector Busby in 1991. The following year Te Aurere

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Ross Gregory talks about Tūmoana

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Tūmoana was captain of the Tinana canoe, which landed at Moria, now known as Te Tauroa, near present-day Ahipara. The image shows Te Tauroa. In the sound file, Ross Gregory, of the northern tribe Te Rarawa, talks about Tūmoana and his career after landing. Sound file from

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Tainui hauling chant

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This karakia was allegedly chanted by the crew of the Tainui as they pulled their canoe across the 200-metre portage separating the Tāmaki River from the Manukau Harbour. The portage was a major route linking the east and west coasts. Today, as the photo of the west end of the portage ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Landing places of South Island canoes

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This map shows the landing places of the Ārai-te-uru and Tākitimu canoes and the passage of the Uruaokapuarangi canoe, captained by Rākaihautū. In the sound file, Ngāi Tahu leader Sir Tīpene O’Regan tells the story of the arrival of Rākaihautū and his son ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Michael Joseph Savage

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Labour Prime Minister Michael Joseph Savage is seen here opening the head office of the new Department of Social Security on 27 March 1939. After suffering setbacks in the 1920s, the Labour Party was finally swept into power in 1935. The government set up a comprehensive welfare state to protect ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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National Party campaign booklet, 1949

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

During the 1949 election campaign, the National Party pictured itself in booklets such as this as representing the nuclear family, the ideal social unit of those years. After winning the 1949 election, National tightened its hold on power in 1951. Prime Minister Sidney Holland asked the country ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Split Enz

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

One of New Zealand’s greatest pop bands, Split Enz first performed in December 1972 and became the first New Zealand group to achieve worldwide success. When lead vocalist Tim Finn left to start a solo career in 1984, the band broke up. However, it still enjoys iconic status. Listen to ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage