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Beeville

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

A resident picks apples at Beeville, near Morrinsville, in a 1970s photo by Ans Westra. Founded in 1933, the anarchist community of Beeville grew out of the extended family of Ray Hansen. Honey production provided a major part of the community's income – hence the name Beeville. ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Hay barn, Sunburst ohu

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

A dog, a rooster and several residents mill around the Sunburst community's hay barn. Sunburst received government approval under the ohu scheme in 1974, and was the first ohu to be established. Residents – a loose group of friends who had lived together in Auckland and the Hokianga &ndash...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Kūmara whakapapa

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This kūmara whakapapa tells how kūmara is descended from Rongo-māui and Pani-tinaku. Whakapapa was integral to the Māori world view – humans, gods and the whole natural world shared genealogical links. Listen to part of 'Pō! Pō!', by Enoka Te Pakaru, which refers to the ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Dalkon Shield cartoon

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In the 1980s the Dalkon Shield intra-uterine device (IUD) caused infections and in some cases sterility among New Zealand women. Many sought compensation. This cartoon, published in the feminist magazine Broadsheet in 1986, questions the motives of the manufacturers of ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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'His name is higher', with David and Dale Garratt

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In 1974 New Zealand charismatic Christian pastors David and Dale Garratt held huge outdoor meetings at racetracks in Palmerston North and Tauranga. Each was attended by about 3,000 people and the Garratts led them in singing devotional songs. These were recorded and later released as ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Freda Stark

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Freda Stark (left) had many lesbian relationships throughout her life. She met actress Thelma Trott (centre) in 1933 and the pair became lovers. The relationship continued after Thelma married conductor Eric Mareo (right), and Freda was a regular guest in the couple's home. Thelma Mareo died in ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Mother Aubert's Paramo

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Catholic nun Suzanne Aubert made herbal remedies from native plants to treat Māori patients. Her remedies were sold commercially in the 1890s. They were packaged in colourful boxes printed with Aubert's image, which was intended to suggest they were trustworthy and reliable. Listen to ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Abortion-rights march

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

With the eruption of furious debate and activism related to abortion both in and outside Parliament in the 1970s, abortion-rights marches became common. This march was in 1973. Listen to a segment from a radio documentary made that year, which includes arguments between those for and against ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Family Care Radio

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Family Care Radio was an internet radio show and website for carers and those they cared for, which operated in 2008 and 2009. Its monthly programmes included regular features on legal issues, continence management, safety in the home, and managing health and stress. The programme for September ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Dementia care

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

While there are specialist residential services for people with dementia, many are cared for at home by family members – often, as in this case, an elderly spouse. When this photograph was taken in 2010, Bev (76) had been suffering from dementia for the previous three years, and had been ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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TranSister Radio interview

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In 2008 and 2009 TranSister Radio regularly broadcast news, music and interviews for the transgender community on the Canterbury community radio station Plains FM. The programe was founded and run by Joanne Clarke, a male-to-female transsexual. Clarke is part of the drag act Playgirls and author ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Home schooling, 1948

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

During a polio epidemic in 1948 children were kept home from school to prevent the disease spreading. This cartoon shows a busy mother trying to do the housework and mind the baby while supervising her children's studies. While healthy children appreciated the time off school because it ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Influenza instructions to nurses

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This poster, published by the New Plymouth Public Health Committee, gives detailed instructions to those nursing influenza patients in 1918. Cases are divided into mild, serious, extreme and delirium. Listen to people who lived through the pandemic describing flu patients suffering from delirium...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Parihaka

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Mt Taranaki forms a dramatic backdrop to the established settlement of Parihaka, painted by George Clarendon Beale around 1881. In the 1870s Parihaka became a centre for peaceful resistance to the land confiscations that followed the Taranaki wars of the previous decade. Populated by followers of...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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The Wanganella, Barrett Reef

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

At 11.30 p.m. on 19 January 1947 the captain of the Wanganella mistook the flashing buoy in front of Barrett Reef for the light to guide ships into Wellington harbour. The ship, with 400 passengers on a voyage from Sydney, struck the reef and remained fast on the rocks. The passengers ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Rainbow Warrior sunk at dock

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

On the evening of 10 July 1985, the Greenpeace boat Rainbow Warrior was blown up by limpet mines while berthed in Auckland Harbour. This was the scene soon after the explosion. The mines turned out to have been planted by French secret agents. In a recording made on the sixth anniversary...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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A Māori proverb

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Pineamine (Pine) Taiapa, pictured, was a master wood carver and an orator with extensive training in traditional knowledge. In this recording he explains to an audience of school children the background to the proverb, ‘Kia mate ururora, kei mate wheke...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Humpback breaching

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Humpbacks are often seen leaping out of the water (breaching) and clowning around. They are also known for the complex and varied nature of their songs. Listen to a humpback whale singing. It is almost certainly a male – only males are known to sing. The ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Graduate Choir

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The Graduate Choir was established in 2001 from former students of Aorere College and comprises 35 singers. Most have recently graduated from apprenticeship choirs, and are beginning their singing careers. In this clip the choir is singing ‘Minoi Minoi...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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When to plant and fish

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Traditionally, Māori measured time according to the nights rather than the days. Nightly cycles began with the new moon. Each night of a lunar month was named and described according to how favourable or unfavourable it was for fishing, eeling or planting. Te Matarēhua Wikiriwhi describes how M...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage