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Kathy Dunstall, Howard League activist

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Kathy Dunstall has been secretary of the Canterbury branch of the Howard League for Penal Reform for many years, and is a major spokesperson for the League. Listen to an extract from a June 2010 radio interview about her work as an advocate for prisoners' rights. Dunstall highlights the ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Romanian children in New Zealand

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Sam, Emma and Elsie, seen at a Wellington play group in 1992, were born in Romania and adopted by New Zealanders. Listen to Department of Social Welfare advisor Paula Dickens talk about the criteria prospective parents need to meet before adopting a child from another country. Sound file ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Unemployed women, 1930s

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This 1932 march of unemployed people through Christchurch is led by women. Elsie Locke, then Elsie Farelly, belonged to the unemployed women's movement in the 1930s. Here she recalls women's part in the movement, and why they organised separately from men. Sound file from

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Dame Anne Salmond

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Listen to this clip from a 2000 radio interview with the Pākehā cultural go-between Dame Anne Salmond. As a teenage university student in Auckland, Salmond met East Coast elders Eruera and Amiria Stirling, who accompanied her to the Māori ceremonial gatherings that formed the subject...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Buzz O'Bumble

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Radio shows have been a popular source of entertainment for children since the mid-20th century. Wellington radio DJ Lindsay Yeo headed a family show on Radio 2ZB in the 1970s and 1980s. He created a cast of characters who appeared on the show and at children's events. Listen to a ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Bombing Bertie the germ

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

'Bertie the germ' was a constant focus of attention in Department of Health advertisements aimed at children in the 1940s and 1950s. Cleaning your teeth and eating fresh fruit and vegetables were a way of keeping Bertie the germ at bay and avoiding tooth decay. In this poster, developed by ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Band of Hope temperance pledge

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Temperance – avoiding alcoholic drink – was a central feature of New Zealand Methodism until the mid-20th century. One of the organisations promoting temperance was the Band of Hope, whose members signed a pledge to 'abstain from all intoxicating liquors'. This magnificent certificate...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Uncle Scrim

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Colin Scrimgeour, known as 'Uncle Scrim', was a Methodist missioner whose Friendly road radio programme was hugely popular during the economic depression in the early 1930s. This 1931 cartoon by Gordon Minhinnick shows him as a rather cunning angel. Listen to Uncle Scrim talking about the ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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US–Kiwi relations

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Generally, United States soldiers based in New Zealand during the Second World War were welcomed. When the line between flirting and having sex was crossed and the soldier got VD, efforts were made to trace the woman or women involved. Listen to a nurse talk about working as a contact ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Beeville

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

A resident picks apples at Beeville, near Morrinsville, in a 1970s photo by Ans Westra. Founded in 1933, the anarchist community of Beeville grew out of the extended family of Ray Hansen. Honey production provided a major part of the community's income – hence the name Beeville. ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Hay barn, Sunburst ohu

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

A dog, a rooster and several residents mill around the Sunburst community's hay barn. Sunburst received government approval under the ohu scheme in 1974, and was the first ohu to be established. Residents – a loose group of friends who had lived together in Auckland and the Hokianga &ndash...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Kūmara whakapapa

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This kūmara whakapapa tells how kūmara is descended from Rongo-māui and Pani-tinaku. Whakapapa was integral to the Māori world view – humans, gods and the whole natural world shared genealogical links. Listen to part of 'Pō! Pō!', by Enoka Te Pakaru, which refers to the ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Dalkon Shield cartoon

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In the 1980s the Dalkon Shield intra-uterine device (IUD) caused infections and in some cases sterility among New Zealand women. Many sought compensation. This cartoon, published in the feminist magazine Broadsheet in 1986, questions the motives of the manufacturers of ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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'His name is higher', with David and Dale Garratt

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In 1974 New Zealand charismatic Christian pastors David and Dale Garratt held huge outdoor meetings at racetracks in Palmerston North and Tauranga. Each was attended by about 3,000 people and the Garratts led them in singing devotional songs. These were recorded and later released as ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Freda Stark

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Freda Stark (left) had many lesbian relationships throughout her life. She met actress Thelma Trott (centre) in 1933 and the pair became lovers. The relationship continued after Thelma married conductor Eric Mareo (right), and Freda was a regular guest in the couple's home. Thelma Mareo died in ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Mother Aubert's Paramo

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Catholic nun Suzanne Aubert made herbal remedies from native plants to treat Māori patients. Her remedies were sold commercially in the 1890s. They were packaged in colourful boxes printed with Aubert's image, which was intended to suggest they were trustworthy and reliable. Listen to ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Abortion-rights march

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

With the eruption of furious debate and activism related to abortion both in and outside Parliament in the 1970s, abortion-rights marches became common. This march was in 1973. Listen to a segment from a radio documentary made that year, which includes arguments between those for and against ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Family Care Radio

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Family Care Radio was an internet radio show and website for carers and those they cared for, which operated in 2008 and 2009. Its monthly programmes included regular features on legal issues, continence management, safety in the home, and managing health and stress. The programme for September ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Dementia care

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

While there are specialist residential services for people with dementia, many are cared for at home by family members – often, as in this case, an elderly spouse. When this photograph was taken in 2010, Bev (76) had been suffering from dementia for the previous three years, and had been ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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TranSister Radio interview

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In 2008 and 2009 TranSister Radio regularly broadcast news, music and interviews for the transgender community on the Canterbury community radio station Plains FM. The programe was founded and run by Joanne Clarke, a male-to-female transsexual. Clarke is part of the drag act Playgirls and author ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage