No filters selected

Narrow your search results by selecting the filters below.

Filter by

Broken

The New Zealand Symphony Orchestra

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The New Zealand Symphony Orchestra is based in Wellington and regularly performs at the Wellington Town Hall. Listen to the orchestra play part of the third movement of ‘Symphony no. 1’ by New Zealand composer Douglas Lilburn. Sound file courtesy of

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
Broken

The Kurahaupō canoe

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The photograph shows a replica of the Kurahaupō canoe. The tribes of Muaūpoko and Rangitāne share the belief that Whātonga was the captain of the canoe. In the song Darren Reid of Muaūpoko tells of the voyage of the canoe and the quest of Whātonga to find his grandfather, the ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
Broken

Harry Orsman

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Harry Orsman edited the Dictionary of New Zealand English (1997), which recorded exclusively New Zealand words. This award-winning dictionary was the outcome of over 40 years of research into New Zealand English. Listen to Orsman talk to radio journalist Brian Edwards about the New ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
Broken

Mākereti Papakura

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Listen to an audio clip from National Radio’s programme about Mākereti Papakura’s life, ‘Remembering Mākereti’. Born near Rotorua in 1873, she became a tourist guide at Whakarewarewa before travelling overseas and marrying a wealthy English farmer. In later life she ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
Broken

The Waipāoa River

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This extract from the waiata (song) ‘Ka haramai a Pāoa’ explains some of the history of the arrival of the Horouta canoe. Notably, it gives an account of how the Waipāoa River (pictured) was formed. Sound file from Radio New...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
Broken

‘Pō, pō’

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This extract from the lullaby ‘Pō, pō’, performed by the Waihirere Māori Club, tells how the kūmara (sweet potato) – a vital source of food for the ancient Māori – was brought to New Zealand. Various tribes provide different accounts of who was responsible for ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
Broken

Heather Nicholson

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Geologist Heather Nicholson stands in front of greywacke outcrops on Waiheke Island, near Auckland. In 1953 she wrote her master’s thesis on the island’s geology and in 2003, exactly 50 years later, she submitted her PhD thesis with the title, ‘The ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
Broken

Home-grown wind and solar power

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Photographed in 1984, Frank Cresswell of Petone was heading for energy self-sufficiency, using a variety of methods to harness Mother Nature’s energy in his back yard. His solar panels heated water to 80°C in summer and 50°C in winter, and the ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
Broken

A lament

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This lament, ‘E pā tō hau’, was composed by Rangiamoa for her cousin Te Wano of Ngāti Apakura and Waikato. Like many such songs, it compares the tears of those mourning to rain falling from the sky. This extract includes the reference to rain.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
Broken

Cicada song

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Listen to the song of the cicada or kihikihi, which conjures up images of hot summer days. The cicada and cricket were described as the song birds of the ‘summer’ star Rehua (Antares), because their song heralded the arrival of warmer weather. Sound file from

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
Broken

Te Hoata and Te Pupu bring fire

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

When Ngātoroirangi had just arrived in New Zealand from Hawaiki, he was overcome by extreme cold at a place called Onetapu. He called out to his sisters Te Hoata and Te Pupu, who sped to him from Hawaiki in the form of fire. When they emerged above ground they created the geysers, hot pools and ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
Broken

Black stilts in flight

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This pair of black stilts is flying above the Cass Valley in the Mackenzie Basin, one of their last strongholds. They breed in isolation on the banks above river braids, or nearby side streams and wetlands. The shallow edges are where they search for food, ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
Broken

Flock of bar-tailed godwits

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

A large flock of godwits settles on the shelly beach of Miranda, on the Firth of Thames coast near Auckland. Eastern bar-tailed godwits arriving from Alaska need to feed intensively to replace the reserves lost during their long flight. They also need to ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
Broken

South Auckland poetry

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Pacific Island words and voices are among the predominant sounds of South Auckland, and are reflected in the creative life of its community. In his poem ‘In a village’, South Auckland Poets Collective member Daren Kamali reflects on the power of the homeland for Pacific Islanders who ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
Broken

Kūmara whakapapa

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This whakapapa shows how the kūmara descends from Rongo-māui and Pani-tinaku. Its origin is referred to in this extract of the waiata 'Pō! Pō!', by Enoka Te Pakaru. In English it translates as: Pō! Pō! My son, Tama, is crying for food! Wait until it is ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
Broken

Te Ara o Tāwhaki

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This wharenui at the Eastern Institute of Technology in Hawke's Bay is named Te Ara o Tāwhaki (the pathway of Tāwhaki). In tribal tradition Tāwhaki journeyed to the heavens to attain knowledge. In this oriori, 'Pinepine te Kura', his ascent to the heavens is described. ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
Broken

Te Kore whakapapa

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This whakapapa represents a European view of the development from Te Kore (the void), to Te Pō (the night), to Te Ao (the day). Early whakapapa often depict these entities in a different order.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
Broken

Volcanic avalanche mounds

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Most large cone volcanoes have a complex history of cone-building followed by collapse. The mounds in front of Mt Taranaki (Mt Egmont) are the remains of a huge landslide that occurred about 23,000 years ago when a large volcanic cone collapsed and spread ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
Broken

A fireman under fire

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Jim Blundell was born in Napier in 1924. In May 1943, aged 19, he got a job in the engine room of a British refrigerated cargo ship, the Port Fairy. Two months later, while the ship was sailing in convoy off Portugal with the troopships Duchess of York and California, ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
Broken

Complaints about the food

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The quality of food provided for the crew often depended as much on the cleanliness of the vessel as the skill of the cook. Listen to Wally Caldwell describe the inadequate diet he endured on pre-war coal-burning vessels. Sound file from Radio New...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage