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Douglas Lilburn's childhood home

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

As a child, composer Douglas Lilburn lived at Drysdale, a sheep station in the upper Turakina valley – a place which he later described as a paradise, and which was to inspire his Drysdale Overture. Sound file from Radio New Zealand...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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‘God defend New Zealand’

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

New Zealand is unusual in having two national anthems of equal standing – ‘God save the queen’ (or king), and the more recent ‘God defend New Zealand’. When a member of the royal family is present the former is preferred. However, increasingly on public occasions and...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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'Split Enz with a bang' tour, 1984

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Until recently, the New Zealand music-buying public would not buy Kiwi music until it had proved popular with overseas audiences. New Zealand’s small population means that many bands still take the flight overseas, chasing dreams of rock stardom. Like many other Kiwi bands, Split Enz, which...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Tongan overstayers

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In the 1960s and 1970s many Tongans stayed on beyond their three-month work permit. In 1974 the New Zealand government announced an amnesty: they were to return to Tonga by a set time or be arrested. In this interview the Tongan lawyer Clive Edwards discusses the panic caused by this announcement...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Longest place name in the world

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

A hill near the coastal settlement of Pōrangahau is believed to have the longest place name in the world. The name is sung at the start of this waiata (song) and is followed by an account – in Māori – of the story behind it of the explorer Tamatea, who climbed the hill and played ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Mokomoko’s pardon, 1993

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Wharehuia Milroy of Ngāi Tūhoe talks about the visit of the justice minister Doug Graham in 1993, to apologise to Te Whakatōhea and the descendants of Mokomoko. Mokomoko was wrongfully accused and hanged for the murder of the missionary, Carl Völkner, in 1865. Shown here is Hiona St ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Īnia Te Wīata singing

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

One 20th-century Ngāti Raukawa figure was the internationally known bass Īnia Te Wīata. Here he sings a Ngāti Raukawa song, ‘He puru tai tama’. Sound file from Īnia Te Wīata, [no-lexicon]Waiata Maori [/no-lexicon], compact disc,

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Cathy Coleborne

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Cathy Coleborne is an Australian who has taught history at Waikato University since 1999. In New Zealand she has become a follower of rugby and rugby league, sports that are more popular in New Zealand than Victoria. In spite of the traditional rivalry between the two countries, she is a ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Support for Radio Hauraki

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In 1966 Radio Hauraki began to broadcast from a ship outside New Zealand waters, so as to circumvent the restrictions on commercial radio. With its focus on popular music, the station quickly attracted a youthful audience – as can be seen in ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Rural delivery mail

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The many small farming settlements in New Zealand have relied on the rural delivery service for over a hundred years. This farmer in the Ruapehu district clears the newspapers, letters and parcels in his rural delivery mailbox, in the 1940s. Listen to rural delivery man Doug Wilson talk ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Giant kauri

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This giant kauri is found at Waiau Falls scenic reserve on the Coromandel Peninsula, not far from Coromandel town. The reserve is part of one of the few unlogged stands found on the peninsula. Listen to Canon Pāora Temuera of Ngāti Raukawa and Te Arawa recite a karakia (prayer) that would once ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Romanian children in New Zealand

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Sam, Emma and Elsie, seen at a Wellington play group in 1992, were born in Romania and adopted by New Zealanders. Listen to Department of Social Welfare advisor Paula Dickens talk about the criteria prospective parents need to meet before adopting a child from another country. Sound file ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Buzz O'Bumble

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Radio shows have been a popular source of entertainment for children since the mid-20th century. Wellington radio DJ Lindsay Yeo headed a family show on Radio 2ZB in the 1970s and 1980s. He created a cast of characters who appeared on the show and at children's events. Listen to a ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Family Care Radio

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Family Care Radio was an internet radio show and website for carers and those they cared for, which operated in 2008 and 2009. Its monthly programmes included regular features on legal issues, continence management, safety in the home, and managing health and stress. The programme for September ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Votes for women

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The campaign for women's suffrage was led by Kate Sheppard (shown here on a stamp, which depicts a detail of the $10 note). Listen to the reminiscences of Mrs Perryman, who voted in the 1893 election (the first in which women could). Sound file from

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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'No Maoris, no tour', 1960

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

A massive protest campaign developed against the proposed 1960 All Black tour of South Africa, since Māori players were banned from the team. The protests were organised by the Citizens' All Black Tour Association (CABTA), chaired by Rolland O'Regan of Ngāi Tahu. This poster announces a...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Anti-tour march, 1981

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Banner-bearing protestors filled the streets of New Zealand on numerous occasions in 1981. In that year, for the first time since 1965, the government agreed to a tour by a racially-selected Springbok team. These banners in Wellington's Willis Street indicate that the tour was opposed by a ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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School milk

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Free milk was provided to school children from 1937 to 1967. These children are drinking their milk in about 1939. Listen to comedian John Clarke's funny take on school milk, in the persona of farmer Fred Dagg. Sound file courtesy of John Clarke

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Kūmara whakapapa

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This whakapapa shows how the kūmara descends from Rongo-māui and Pani-tinaku. Its origin is referred to in this extract of the waiata 'Pō! Pō!', by Enoka Te Pakaru. In English it translates as: Pō! Pō! My son, Tama, is crying for food! Wait until it is ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Michael Joseph Savage's victory speech, 1935

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

'Now then, ladies and gentlemen.' In the era before television, the reassuring tones of Michael Joseph Savage, the first Labour prime minister, became familiar to the entire country through radio broadcasts. On 27 November 1935, soon after Labour's historic victory in the general election, Savage...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage