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Home schooling, 1948

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

During a polio epidemic in 1948 children were kept home from school to prevent the disease spreading. This cartoon shows a busy mother trying to do the housework and mind the baby while supervising her children's studies. While healthy children appreciated the time off school because it ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Influenza instructions to nurses

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This poster, published by the New Plymouth Public Health Committee, gives detailed instructions to those nursing influenza patients in 1918. Cases are divided into mild, serious, extreme and delirium. Listen to people who lived through the pandemic describing flu patients suffering from delirium...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Parihaka

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Mt Taranaki forms a dramatic backdrop to the established settlement of Parihaka, painted by George Clarendon Beale around 1881. In the 1870s Parihaka became a centre for peaceful resistance to the land confiscations that followed the Taranaki wars of the previous decade. Populated by followers of...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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The Wanganella, Barrett Reef

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

At 11.30 p.m. on 19 January 1947 the captain of the Wanganella mistook the flashing buoy in front of Barrett Reef for the light to guide ships into Wellington harbour. The ship, with 400 passengers on a voyage from Sydney, struck the reef and remained fast on the rocks. The passengers ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Rainbow Warrior sunk at dock

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

On the evening of 10 July 1985, the Greenpeace boat Rainbow Warrior was blown up by limpet mines while berthed in Auckland Harbour. This was the scene soon after the explosion. The mines turned out to have been planted by French secret agents. In a recording made on the sixth anniversary...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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A Māori proverb

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Pineamine (Pine) Taiapa, pictured, was a master wood carver and an orator with extensive training in traditional knowledge. In this recording he explains to an audience of school children the background to the proverb, ‘Kia mate ururora, kei mate wheke...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Humpback breaching

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Humpbacks are often seen leaping out of the water (breaching) and clowning around. They are also known for the complex and varied nature of their songs. Listen to a humpback whale singing. It is almost certainly a male – only males are known to sing. The ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Graduate Choir

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The Graduate Choir was established in 2001 from former students of Aorere College and comprises 35 singers. Most have recently graduated from apprenticeship choirs, and are beginning their singing careers. In this clip the choir is singing ‘Minoi Minoi...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Paparoa National Park

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Paparoa National Park, on the South Island’s West Coast, was founded in 1987. The Pancake Rocks, jutting into the sea, are among the park’s best-known sights. The limestone they are formed from underlies most of the landscape, and can be seen running diagonally up the hill to the left...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Franz Josef Glacier

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Franz Josef Glacier is one of the famous sights of Westland Tai Poutini National Park. Like Fox Glacier to the south, it is unusual because it reaches West Coast rainforest near its end, and the huge cascade of ice is fringed by ferns and trees. Listen to Philip Liner interviewing a guide...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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When to plant and fish

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Traditionally, Māori measured time according to the nights rather than the days. Nightly cycles began with the new moon. Each night of a lunar month was named and described according to how favourable or unfavourable it was for fishing, eeling or planting. Te Matarēhua Wikiriwhi describes how M...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Catching crayfish

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

These men are fishing with a pouraka (hoop net). The net was used to catch kōura (crayfish), īnanga (whitebait) or other small fish. The best time to catch crayfish with a pouraka was Māwharu. Fishing personality Bill Hohepa points out that the names for the phases of the moon vary ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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A food for all seasons

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This song ‘Ngā wehenga o te tau’ (the seasons) recalls the various types of traditional work for each season. Different types of food were collected according to the time of year; however, aruhe (fern root), shown piled up, was a reliable year-round staple. Sound file from

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Winter stars

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

To some tribes the new year in mid-winter was signalled by the dawn rising of Matariki (the Pleiades), while to others it was the rising of Puanga (Rigel). Takurua (Sirius) was also associated with winter. Along with other stars, Matariki, Puanga, and Tautoru (Orion's Belt) were important in the ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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A symbol of patriotism

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The Southern Cross has been incorporated into the design of the New Zealand Tomb of the Unknown Warrior, at the National War Memorial in Wellington. Crosses on the side of the tomb represent the warrior’s fallen companions as well as the stars in the ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Home-grown wind and solar power

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Photographed in 1984, Frank Cresswell of Petone was heading for energy self-sufficiency, using a variety of methods to harness Mother Nature’s energy in his back yard. His solar panels heated water to 80°C in summer and 50°C in winter, and the ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Heather Nicholson

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Geologist Heather Nicholson stands in front of greywacke outcrops on Waiheke Island, near Auckland. In 1953 she wrote her master’s thesis on the island’s geology and in 2003, exactly 50 years later, she submitted her PhD thesis with the title, ‘The ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Measuring fish

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

A fisheries official measures a fish aboard the Taiko Maru No 2. The industry has become increasingly regulated since the 1980s and fishermen must keep detailed records of their catches. Listen to an interview with the director of the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries at the time, ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Baited longlines

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In longline fishing, very long lines are strung with many baited hooks and drawn through the water. Malcolm Harrison, an Auckland longline fisherman, talks about landing snapper and gurnard in the late 1950s. Sound file from

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Sealing song

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In February 1810 a gang of 10 sealers were left here, at Open Bay Island, near Jackson Bay in Westland, by the brig Active. The ship was lost and the men were stranded on the island for almost four years, living on seal meat and fern root before they were rescued. This song tells of ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage