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Te Kore whakapapa

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This whakapapa represents a European view of the development from Te Kore (the void), to Te Pō (the night), to Te Ao (the day). Early whakapapa often depict these entities in a different order.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Kūmara whakapapa

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This whakapapa shows how the kūmara descends from Rongo-māui and Pani-tinaku. Its origin is referred to in this extract of the waiata 'Pō! Pō!', by Enoka Te Pakaru. In English it translates as: Pō! Pō! My son, Tama, is crying for food! Wait until it is fetched from the...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Te Ara o Tāwhaki

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This wharenui at the Eastern Institute of Technology in Hawke's Bay is named Te Ara o Tāwhaki (the pathway of Tāwhaki). In tribal tradition Tāwhaki journeyed to the heavens to attain knowledge. In this oriori, 'Pinepine te Kura', his ascent to the heavens is described. Sound file from...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Bombing Bertie the germ

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

'Bertie the germ' was a constant focus of attention in Department of Health advertisements aimed at children in the 1940s and 1950s. Cleaning your teeth and eating fresh fruit and vegetables were a way of keeping Bertie the germ at bay and avoiding tooth decay. In this poster, developed by ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Family Care Radio

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Family Care Radio was an internet radio show and website for carers and those they cared for, which operated in 2008 and 2009. Its monthly programmes included regular features on legal issues, continence management, safety in the home, and managing health and stress. The programme for September ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Dementia care

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

While there are specialist residential services for people with dementia, many are cared for at home by family members – often, as in this case, an elderly spouse. When this photograph was taken in 2010, Bev (76) had been suffering from dementia for the previous three years, and had been ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Home schooling, 1948

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

During a polio epidemic in 1948 children were kept home from school to prevent the disease spreading. This cartoon shows a busy mother trying to do the housework and mind the baby while supervising her children's studies. While healthy children appreciated the time off school because it ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Influenza instructions to nurses

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This poster, published by the New Plymouth Public Health Committee, gives detailed instructions to those nursing influenza patients in 1918. Cases are divided into mild, serious, extreme and delirium. Listen to people who lived through the pandemic describing flu patients suffering from delirium...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Te Hoata and Te Pupu bring fire

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

When Ngātoroirangi had just arrived in New Zealand from Hawaiki, he was overcome by extreme cold at a place called Onetapu. He called out to his sisters Te Hoata and Te Pupu, who sped to him from Hawaiki in the form of fire. When they emerged above ground they created the geysers, hot pools and ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Pōhā (kelp)

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Traditional pōhā (kelp bags encased in tōtara bark) are used to store the harvested tītī chicks. Bob Whaitiri talks about pōhā. Sound file from Radio New Zealand Sound Archives Ngā Taonga Kōrero

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Perano whaling

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Five generations of Heberleys hunted whales. The last two were Charlie Heberley and his son Joe who worked at the Perano whaling station at the entrance to Tory Channel. In the sound clip they recall the excitement and danger of those days. The image from June 1952 shows workers at the ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Collecting toheroa

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The large, sand-burrowing shellfish known as toheroa made such good eating (usually as a soup) that New Zealanders consumed them faster than the species could breed. From 1932 until 1993 the government imposed restrictions on harvesting, but these measures were not enough to halt the decline. ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Fishing boats, Milford Sound

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

A few commercial fishermen operate out of Milford Sound, where their main catches are blue cod, crayfish and pāua (abalone). It is a harsh environment to work in. In this sound clip, a local fisherman describes conditions at the mouth of a fiord after ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Pick-and-shovel mining

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

These West Coast miners from the end of the 19th century pause in their labours. The traditional technique for extracting coal, which miners brought from Britain, depended entirely on muscle power. Miners chopped out coal with picks and then shovelled it ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Brunner mine disaster, 1896

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The photograph shows one of the first bodies to be recovered from the Brunner mine. The worst loss of life in New Zealand mining occurred at this mine on 26 March 1896. An explosion was heard at 9.30 a.m. Two men went underground to investigate and were ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Europa petrol station

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

During the 1930s, Europa was one of the brand names under which imported petrol was sold to New Zealand motorists. This radio jingle was used to advertise the fuel to motorists. Sound file from Radio New Zealand Sound Archives Ngā Taonga Kōrero...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Make your own Geiger counter

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This DSIR booklet included instructions on how to make a cheap Geiger counter. For several years enthusiasts used their own counters, hoping that the ticking would suddenly speed up, indicating radioactivity. This sound file illustrates what happens when a ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Kūmara whakapapa

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This kūmara whakapapa (genealogy) shows how kūmara is descended from Rongo-māui and Pani-tinaku. Listen to an extract from Pō! Pō!, a waiata (song) by Enoka Te Pakaru, which refers to the origin of the kūmara. It translates into English as: Pō! Pō! My son, Tama...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Annabelle White

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Annabelle White (second from left), cookbook author and media personality, poses with the winners of a gourmet competition at Plum City near Havelock North, Hawke’s Bay. Listen to her description of Hawke’s Bay stone fruit attractions. Soundfile ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Nesting white-backed magpies

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Magpies were introduced from Australia. They normally nest in exotic trees, like this pair in a pine. They are found throughout the North Island and in most parts of the South Island, except Central Otago and the northern and southern tips of the West Coast. They have entered the national ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage